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Full text of "...Mirror : Waltham High School"



WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 4867 00650 2340 



t to b a this re 



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COBB'S 

ON MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM 



PARKING FOR 50 CARS 
AT REAR OF STORE 



WATCH OUR WINDOWS 



WALTHAM AUTOMOTIVE Corp. 

Service Parts for 

Cars, Trucks and Buses 

Electrical and Speedometer Repairs 
High Grade Repairing and Rebuilding 
215 Lexington Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Tel. Waltham 2600 - 2601 



0' TOOLE 
Jflortet 

719 Main St., Waltham, Mass. 
Tel. Waltham 2961 



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SPORT1**& 




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373 Moody Street 

Tel. Wal. 3250 



The Best Is the Cheapest 

This applies to COAL just 
the same as to all kinds of 
merchandise. We handle 
only the best grades. 

Established 1872 

Clean Coal 

Prompt Delivery 

Careful Teamsters 

WALTHAM COAL CO. 

Telephone 0116 



Sheet Music, Musical Instruments, Music Supplies 
Phonographs, Eecords 

JOHN ERNEST MERKER 

833A MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

It's getting to be a music habit in Waltham to 
"Meet Me At Merkers" 

All the latest songs and records 
833A Main Street Waltham 0089 



Open every evening 



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LALPAR AUTO FINISHING CO. 

Refinishers in 
DUCO, LACQUER AND ENAMEL 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRS 

204 Lexington Street 
WALTHAM SAVINGS BANK 

702 MAIN STREET 
October dividend at the rate of 5% per annum 



Interest begins the 10th of each month 
Open Wednesday and Saturday Evenings from 7 to 8 o'clock for Deposits 

ELLSWORTH B. REED, PHARM. D. 

655 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Tel. Waltham 0700 

Prescription Pharmacist 



HARTMANN CUSHION TOP WARDROBE TRUNKS 

W. L. TAYLOR 

TRUNKS, BAGS and LEATHER GOODS 

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NASH MOTOR CARS 



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7 Elm Street, Waltham 
Phone Wal. 3262-M 



EADIO 



P. A. PEARCE 

THE FIVE-LINE STORE 

571 MAIN STEEET 

Waltham 

Telephone 1813=M 

ELECTEIC SPOETING GOODS 



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GRADUATION NUMBER 



The <JMirror 




CONTENTS 




Editorial, Cleveland Thomas 


9 


Class Ode, Dorothy Griswold 


11 


Class Prophecy, Francis Adler 


12 


Class Will 


25 


Who's Who 


27 


Class History, Olive Mott 


28 


Athletics 


34 


Class Statistics 


40 


Class Activities by Pupils 


52 



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In the Long Run 

you and your friends will prize the portrait that look 
like you- your truest self, free from stage effects and 
little conceits. 



It is in this "long run" photography that Purdy suc- 
cess has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh at or 
cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect your pho- 
tographic self by having Purdy make the portraits. 

PURDY 

160 Tremont St., Boston 

Official photographer, Waltham High School 
Class of 1930 



THE MIRROR 

Vol. XXI Waltham, Mass., June, 1930 No.4 

"-to fiotti, a£ 'ttoere, tfte mirror up to nature" 

Hamlet, Act. Ill, Sc. ii 



y 



x 



The Mirror Staff 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BUSINESS MANAGER 

Cleveland Thomas Gilbert Peterson 

ASS'T. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGER 

Irwin Smith Francis Carroll Jx 

EXCHANGE EDITOR ASS'T. EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Ruth Henry Alma Pontz 



ATHLETIC EDITORS X 

(Girls) Mildred Fox (Boys) Charles Carney 



£ NEW BOOKS EDITOR ASS'T. NEW BOOKS EDITOR V 

IQ Edith Hughes Virginia Thomas Jl 

JOKES EDITOR ASS'T. JOKES EDITOR 

Dorothy Griswold Guy Meyer 

X > 

X MUSIC EDITOR PC 

Edith Kniznik 



X ART EDITOR ASS'T. ART EDITOR * 



Herbert Estabrooks Charles Parelli ? 

LITERARY EDITORS 



Harold Keeman Barbara Gauthier 

* Grace Barrett Joint Chairmen Wendell Maher * 

Helen Cataldo Donald Harrington p* 

Joyce Glendenning Morrison Shirley 

Rozilla Chase Richard Weare 

Charlotte Bell Howard Badger 

Lawrence Fuller Hazel Sinclair 

S Dorothy Van der Wyk 2 

REPORTERS 

Room 4 Robert Nellson Room 13 Frank Farrar 

UJ Room 5 Lois Clark Room 14 Ruth Thompson J< 

jq Room 9 Robert Ferrick Pioom 19 Roy Bradley v 

Room 7 Dorothy Martin Room 20 Harry Queen 

Room 10 Lillas Mann Room 22 Frana Packard 

Room 11 Alton Meyer Room 35 Edna Clasby 
Afternoon Session : Margaret Englund 

rf M fc f tf K^-— « K < XH VV ^V W Sf 



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Waltham's "Uptown" Ice Cream— Luncheon and Candy Shop 

For 15 Years 



t 



ICE CREAM Jf\T T V'C Home Made 

and Delicious ICES J V*/l J * J J- w Chocolates and Candies 



Hot and Cold Luncheons, Sandwiches and Salads 

Served At All Hours 

Home Made Pastry to Take Home—Try Our Famous Chocolates 

at 70c lb. 

Ice Cream Delivered in 'Phone Orders 

Waltham, Newton, Auburndale Given Prompt Attention 

and Watertown Tel. IO4.3 

455 MOODY STREET CHARLES KEITH, Prop. WALTHAM 



KATHARINE GIBBS 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive purpose for 

educated women 
ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL 

One Year Course includes technical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of a preferred character. 
Two- Year Course for high school graduates. First year includes 
six college subjects. Second year intensive secretarial training. 
The cultural background provided in this course develops in 
the young woman of refinement the well-balanced and resourceful 
mind required for the higher type of position. 

Also Special Course for College Women 

New York Boston Providence 

247 Park Avenue 90 Marlboro Street 150 Angell Street 

Resident School in Boston 



THE MIRROR 




tyafca—J 



NCE again the day of Commencement is fast ap- 
proaching and once again Waltham High will send 
its graduating class into the world, some to work, some to 
attend higher institutions of learning. 

As the day comes nearer, so does the end of the 
grind of studies. But with it also comes the end of the 
many joys and pleasures connected with high school life. 
For, despite our growlings and groanings over studies, 
most of us will admit that our high school career has been 
one of joy and amusements, and many will leave, sadly 
realizing that they may never again participate in foot- 
ball, baseball, dramatics, or whatever their own special 
hobby may have been; that they may be losing forever the 
delightful companionships formed. Some of those who 
go to work will rejoice in it, while others will gaze with 
envy upon those privileged ones who are to enter college 
in the fall. Some of those going to college will be en- 
tirely free of worry about finances and scholarship; others 
will have to struggle perpetually for what they desire. 
And there will be those whose greatest wish is to go fur- 
ther with their education but who are unable to do 
so, who will feel completely lost, wondering fearfully what 
the future may hold for them. All these individuals are 
compounded in a Senior Class, and few can truthfully say 
that their three years in high school have been unpleasant 
or that they are unable to understand the hackneyed 
phrase of parents, "I wish I were in your place!" 



10 THE MIRROR 

As we pass on, we surrender our place to the present 
Junior Class, envying them and at the same time feeling 
more or less superior to them. To them we confide a duty, 
a trust, an obligation : that of upholding Waltham's High's 
standard in athletics, in social successes, and last, but not 
least, in scholarship. If they fail, they commit an unpre- 
cedented act; if they succeed, — well, that is what they are 
expected to do. And so we transfer a burden from our 
shoulders to those of the Junior Class. 

Finally, at this time, overlooking its age, its diminu- 
tiveness, and its inconveniences, (for even the powers that 
be cannot deny that it is aged and small, and its incon- 
veniences are many) we bid our farewell to Waltham 
High School, to its joys, to its pleasures, and to its many 
loved associations. 

Cleveland Thomas, 1930, 




Class of 1930 



ass 



icers 




FRANCIS ADLER 
Class Prophet 



DOROTHY GRISWOLD 

Class Poet 




THE MIRROR 11 

Class Ode 






HE King of Life was holding court that day, 
And you and I were numbered 'mong the throng. 
Many a mile we'd traveled far, and now 
To the great castle door we came — and stopped. 
Before us stood the beautiful "Great Hopes" 
Conversing with "Lost Chances" on the path. 
Next passed we the stern sentry, "Character," 
Whose gleaming armor shone 
As clean and clear as the bright sun above. 
The halls of Education we traversed 
Which gleamed with armoured knights of culture fine, 
Then down the steps of Failure faltered we, 
While each step sneered and leered, 
Or so it seemed. 

Not daunted, on we strode past frowning Pate 

And to the King, by jewelled Chance were led. 

High throned the mighty King before us sat 

Surrounded by his noble courtiers. 

'Twas quiet there and sweet as sylvan dell; 

Green moss had softly grown around the throne; 

The flowers of life were swaying gently in the breeze, 

While music softly played to us the strains 

Of Dreams — not idle, useless, but quite real. 

And thus the King more knowledge did impart: 

"Advice I give you: follow these new paths 

That lead o'er windy hills and stormy seas 

Through bright and sun-kissed fields and moors of gold, 

Perpetual curving on to wondrous views. 

Par in the distance gleams the noble light Success. 

Strike out, push on, it guides your way." 

His wise instructions done, the King arose 

As from his throne above he smiled, 

And gave his benediction as we passed. 

Dorothy Griswold. 



12 THE MIRROR 

CLASS PROPHECY— 1930 



e 



m& 



ACH tick of the clock makes us a few minutes older. 
The minutes soon grow into hours; the hours grow 
into days, and the days into years. I was emphatically 
reminded of this fact by a certain little envelope I had 
received. 

This envelope contained an invitation to the dedica- 
tion of the new Waltham Senior High School: new in fact 
but not in theory. After twenty long years a dream had 
become a reality. 

In conjunction with the festivities at the dedication, 
the Class of 1930 was to hold a reunion — the twentieth an- 
niversary of their escape from the fastness of Waltham 
Senior High School. 

On the night of May 16, 1950, bedecked in my evening 
clothes, I set out for the new high school. The night was 
dark, as are all nights. In fact, it was a normal night. 

As I made my way along Bacon Street, I made out the 
form of a person through the encircling gloom. It was the 
gigantic form of Salvatore Eizzo. He served as a body- 
guard for the frail Lorimcr Hanselpacker, now a "butter 
and egg man". "Sal" was searching for Lorimer whom he 
had lost in the dark. 

Just as I was going up the walk to the school, a car 
drew up at the curb. A man got out burdened down with 
a huge satchel. There was something familiar about him. 
It was none other than Alfonso Castellano. He told me 
that he was a salesman of cosmetics and was going to try 
to interest the women teachers in his wares. 

The school was a masterpiece. It was planned by 
that great architect Phillip Jackson, who acquired a taste 
for neatness and symmetry from his school work. You per- 
haps can remember what masterpieces his geometry pa- 
pers were. 



THE MIRROR 13 

My quest for beauty was arrested by a truly brilliant 
sight. A detail of neatly uniformed policemen were lined 
up on either side of the steps. They were under the super- 
vision of their capable chief Richard Wear of Senior Play 
fame. Close to him was his righthand man, Robert John- 
son, bedecked with a sporty little mustache. Amongst the 
ranks of the "city's finest" I recognized James Crowe, 
George Gannon, Alexander Kann and Howard Badger. 
They lived up to the old spirit of "law and order" of Wal- 
tham High. 

With military precision and smartness that would 
give credit to West Pointers, they saluted and marched 
into the school. 

Through the evening air there came floating to my 
ears a familiar sound, the sound commonly known as a 
"razzberrie". I turned around and there, leaning on a 
broom was my old pal, Ralph Andrews, That lad cer- 
tainly was a sweeping success, janitor of the new high 
school. 

My nostrils detected the scent of delicate perfume and 
before my eyes floated a vision of beauty. Standing in 
front of me was Mabel Frost, the happy spouse of Carl 
Anderson. "Andy" is the professor of dramatic arts at the 
University of Chicago. His voice had acquired a cultured 
and feminine tone. 

Strolling nonchalantly along enjoying the beauty of 
the new edifice of learning. I was brought to an abrupt 
stop by a wild-looking chap who seized my arm. He was 
unkempt and ragged. His face was covered with a dense 
beard and his hair was long and matted. With a voice that 
quavered and cracked he whispered in my ear, "Women, 
I hate them". 'Twas then I recognized "Peters" the her- 
mit, alias George Perna. His wife, Dorothy Griswold, had 
run off with a traveling salesman. The salesman was 
Cleveland Thomas. Life was bitter for George. 



14 THE MIRROR 

The auditorium of the school was both beautiful and 
spacious. It was rapidly filling up as I walked in and took 
a seat. I had no sooner sat down than I jumped up with 
a gasp of surprise. Were my eyes deceiving me? I asked 
my neighbor who the pompous individual about to take 
the speakers' stand was. He informed me that it was 
"Stan" Krol, the principal of the high school. Will won- 
ders never cease? 

Across the aisle from me was a row of dignified 
women. Their looks bespoke their importance. I was 
told that they were delegates from the "Society for Needy 
Cats". I noticed amongst their number a few former co- 
eds. Sitting in the row were Edith Clarkson, Irene Clark, 
Olive Grenier, and Eleanor Gough. Theirs is a worthy 
cause. 

A group of dancers were now furnishing entertain- 
ment. Going through dizzy actions upon the stage were 
Alden McLaskey, Beulaii Long, Edith Hughes, and Henry 
Bowers. I was entranced by the beauty of the scene. 

The trance was broken by someone yelling, "Fire! 
Fire! Fire!" I turned to see the cause of all the commo- 
tion. Three or four rows back was a huge cloud of smoke. 
When the smoke subsided a little, I recognized Paul Hal- 
leran smoking a huge cigar. This was put out by a fire 
extinguisher in the hands of Robert Ferrick, who was a 
fireman in his spare time. ''Eagle Eye" Halleran, the 
owner of the burlesque show, was accompanied by John 
Quigley, who wrote all the gags and music for the show. 
They were having tough luck, for the leading lady, 
Pomona Ball, had gone on a strike for more pay. 

Fate had played many queer tricks with some of my 
school mates. Many of them were hard to believe — 

The music (I almost forgot to tell you) for the exer- 
cises was furnished by the Salvation Army Band under 



THE MIRROR 15 

the capable direction of the one and only Nicholas Cannis- 
traro. Under his leadership the band furnished music 
that was real and vivid; so real you couldn't sleep. Some 
of the players filling the air with noise were familiar to 
me. Kobert McKenna, Philip Clarke, Barton Eldridge, 
and Charley Carney were all trying their best to burst the 
audience's ear-drums. There was music in the air. 

I know you would all be glad to hear about the mem- 
bers of the faculty in the new school. I was intensely in- 
terested. 

Faces that bespoke intelligence. Speech that was cul- 
tured and refined. A faculty that would confer credit on 
any school. Some of them were known to me in the good 
old days as "Marj" Brown, Muriel Kippen, Evelyn Powers, 
Mary DeCoste and Elsie Haines. To think that they are 
content to remain single for the rest of their lives! Pate, 
you are a funny thing. 

There were many notables present that evening. 
Amongst them I noticed Donald Pelkey, a great figure in 
the Boy Scout movement and the founder of the now fa- 
mous Bobbins' Park Troop. Let the trumpets blow for 
him. Don gave me a copy of the "Evening Star", pub- 
lished by Thomas Murphy, which contained an account of 
the return of the famous explorer George LaPorte. He 
had just come back from studying some ancient ruins. He 
acquired his love for exploration from Ancient History, 
no doubt. 

Nelle Cummins, the charming wife of Alfred Freeman, 

who was owner of a snowshoe factory in Florida, rendered 
a beautiful vocal solo, composed by the honorable Colin 
Dale. The song was entitled "I Gave Him a Thousand 
Dollars to be a Millionaire". The sale of this song had 
been tremendous. Over fifty copies had been sold. 



16 THE MIRROR 

The roll call of the class of 1930 was called. 

The first absentee was Paul "Chick" Carlson. "Chick" 
was the founder of a clinic for invalids of all kinds. One 
drink of his famous "fizz water" was guaranteed to cure 
all ills. His slogan "cure or kill", was brought out by the 
fact that an undertaker was always in attendance. This 
undertaker was "Bill Gerrie". Business for him, just now, 
was dead. 

"AP Langill and Stetson Eisden were up in the Arctic 
Circle trying to sell ice chests to the Eskimos. No doubt 
they were doing a rushing business. 

Edward Furbush and Johnnie May were in the navy 
cruising somewhere in Southern waters. ' When they are 
in dock all you can hear is bragging about their sweet- 
hearts in every port. Such popularity must be deserved. 
Dorothy Ellison, now known as Mrs. Edward T&telman, 
was at home caring for their large family. "Ed" himself 
was there looking a bit worn and henpecked, but, never- 
theless, quite cheerful. 

Now comes something of interest. Five names of 
absentees were read from the roll. The five names were 
Grace Barret, Ethel Affleck, Gwendolyn Baxter, Gertrude 
Colburn, and Carolyn Snow. They were at this time in 
mid-ocean bound for a certain island where there was a 
scarcity of women, intent on becoming the wives of some 
of these men who have been hungering for love and de- 
votion. "Yearn no more, my dear brothers. Salvation is 
at hand." 

These next few words are so hard to write. Two 
names were read off and the tears started in the eyes of 
even the most hardened. 

James MacMillan and John McDermott, two superb 
specimens of manhood, were now numbered amongst the 
missing. Without a thought for their own safety (all 
brave men are the same) they set out in their plane to res- 
cue two castaways on Fox Island. The fliers lost their 



THE MIRROR 17 

bearings and were last seen heading towards Norumbega 
Park. It is common talk that they have succumbed to the 
rigors of the wilderness in those regions. "May their 
brave souls rest in peace" — 

The roll is called and all regrets are paid; therefore, 
let us stray to more cheerful scenes. 

The new school boasts a spacious and well equipped 
gymnasium. The assembly had adjourned to this fore- 
named place, and dancing was now in progress. The mu- 
sic, which was very good, was furnished by an orchestra 
under the capable direction of Sam Caplan. Sam with his 
crooning voice and tender masculine beauty had won his 
way to the hearts of thousands of women. The orchestra 
was a remarkable group of musicians. They were all so- 
loists. 

Earl Dewar could certainly toot a mean sax. It was 
so mean it was terrible. 

Let the drums roll out. Those drums surely did roll 
out. Herman Ingber, he of the sinewy arm, certainly did 
his best to break those drums. 

Fred Barrows, violinist, Eaymond MacKenzie, cornet- 
ist, and Wilbur Hornbeck, trombonist, contributed to the 
general discord. They sounded somewhat like Chicago, — 
I mean the stockyards. 

The women present were beautifully gowned. One, 
who especially attracted my attention, was Helen Win- 
gate, with whom I had a chance to speak. I asked her 
where she purchased the gown (I also begged her pardon 
for being so rude as to ask). She told me it was one of the 
latest Paris creations, purchased at the Cherie Style 
Shoppe. 

The shop was owned by William Pendergast and 
Allesandro Miele. They had studied styles abroad for 
several years and were now prepared to serve the public. 
Their creations had the touch of the artiste. Their shoppe 
employed several mannequins among whom were Har- 



18 THE MIRROR 

riette Carter, Anna Daley, Bernice Gordon, and Eileen 
Hill. Who could resist the temptation of buying clothes 
that these beautiful persons wore? 

In the distance I saw Donald Smith. "Don has the 
one trait I admire in a person; patience and determina- 
tion. He has developed into a great runner. He has been 
running for mayor the last ten years. 

As I mentioned before, there was dancing in progress, 
and the floor was well filled with couples. Some of the 
couples danced in a rather professional manner; in fact, 
they were professionals. 

Ruth Thompson, Renato lodice, Francis Nichols, Mil- 
lard Merryman, Felix Mohilia, and Isabel Meader were the 
couples. They were marathon dancers fresh from a coun- 
try tour of dance halls. 

You might think these individuals mad, but there was 
method in their madness. They were backed by a large 
shoe manufacturer, whose shoes were worn to show their 
durability. The shoe manufacturer was Richard Pontz. 
He has put his whole soul into the business. 

Speaking of shoes and dancing brought into my mind 
the thought of Isabel Finnegan and Arthur Logan, who 
were now the darlings of thousands. As dancers they had 
no equal (at least the bill boards said so). 

Surrounded by a group of admirers was one of our 
classmates who has been doing some traveling. Helena 
Lancaster, now known as Mrs. Macfarlane, the proud and 
beaming wife of Elton Macfarlane, had just returned from 
Ireland. It is said that she had been looking for a harp. 

Elton, good old reliable "Mac", stayed at home while 
his wife spent the family roll. "Mac" was in the piano- 
tuning business. He specialized in Scotch pianos. 

I espied in the crowd Ruth Henry and Lois Clark. 
They were in the real estate business together. Ruth had 
quite a reputation as a thrifty sort of person. I can hardly 
blame Lois for fainting when Ruth handed her a twenty- 



THEMIRROR 19 

dollar bill and said,, "Here, go buy yourself an ice cream 
cone". Lois was soon revived under the gentle care of 
Marie Laske, who was now a nurse. Long hours of hard 
work had taken heavy toll upon the once beautiful fea- 
tures of Marie; that school girl complexion was gone but 
not forgotten. 

At this point in the entertainment, refreshments were 
served. The food was furnished by Clifton Winn & Com- 
pany, caterers. Clifton with his good wife, who was for- 
merly known as Betty Cannon, had built up a flourishing 
business by catering to the wants of the inner man. 

All was peaceful until Marion Dart and Betty Carpen- 
ter began to argue. The cause of the argument was their 
differences of opinion on the best way to make chocolate 
cake. They were both engaged as cooks in some of the 
wealthier households. Loud and long waged the battle 
until finally they fell to blows. The combatants were soon 
separated by two policewomen. The policewomen were 
Ruth Feeney and Sarah Thurston. They were two stal- 
wart pillars of the law. 

All the various branches of life were represented in 
the gathering that evening. Walter Lane, the famous 
beauty specialist, was there with his wife, the former 
Eileen Sangeleer. Walter had of course no need to prac- 
tice on his wife. Edith Pierce and Martha Ostrand, the fa- 
mous "Soap Twins", were splendid in clothes of immacu- 
late white. They were used in soap advertisements; you 
know, "The Skin You Love to Touch." The feminine sex 
had taken up the occupations of the male quite extensive- 
ly. Believe it or not — Dorothy Brown, Elsie Cheney, 
Helen Englund, Eleanor Costeilo, and Augusta Hagerty 
are engaged as truck-drivers. They drive for Lyman 
Bowker, the owner of a large coal company. It is said 
that Lyman is a hard taskmaster. 

Life is pretty dull if we don't have a little color around 
us to relieve the monotony of things. Two of our erst- 
while classmates with this thought in mind had been earn- 



20 THEMIRROR 

ing a comfortable living. Howard Millen and Samuel 
Milesky were the foremost decorators of hot dog stands 
this side of the Rockies. 

I always like to speak of the scientific ventures of my 
classmates. John and Louis Bartleman are trying to 
grow "tearless" onions. They haven't quite eliminated 
all the tears as yet. 

Life is dull without pleasure. I met some of my class- 
mates who were wonderful entertainers. Virginia Russo, 
Pasqualina (Marietta, Catherine Haley and Frances Regan 
were members of a record breaking musical show. Their 
beauty and shapeliness were one of the main features of the 
show, of which Gladys Hamilton was the owner and man- 
ager. The music for the show was written and directed 
by Marjorie Manning. Dancing was easy with such won- 
derful music. Gilbert Peterson, Kenneth Scanlon, and 
Ruth Melanson formed a team of acrobatic dancers that 
were simply wonderful. They have to be seen to be appre- 
ciated. Dean Ricciato, the leading lady, was having a little 
matrimonial trouble. She was suing her husband, Thomas 
Webber, for divorce. She must have been reading the life 
of Peggy Joyce. Before I leave the discussion of this show 
business, I want to tell you about another interesting per- 
sonage connected with it; he was the "big noise", he made 
all of the different noises necessary for the various effects. 
Chester Sheer filled the position well. 

Gladys told me Donald Hills, the physical instructor 
of the school, looked with disdain on the pallid individuals 
who were members of the show. Carl Uhlin was Don's 
capable assistant. He made quite a hit with the ladies. 
Dorothy Derbyshire was the physical instructor for the 
girls. She had as an assistant Gena Higgins. They were 
veritable amazons. 

One of the shining lights of the evening was Duncan 
Chapman the great automobile manufacturer. His type 
of car could be driven with one arm. He owns a large 
plant and has a big force of men working for him, whose 



THE MIRROR 21 

names were known to me in former days as Helen Sulmo- 
netti, Hazel Sinclair, Pearl Nelson, and Laura Mitchell. 

They are designing engineers. Designing dresses gave 
them their start. Leonard Dubin is chief engineer and has 
several capable assistants. The cars are masterpieces of 
harmonious color. They have the appearance of "Pie 
Ally" on wash Monday. Irving Norman is chief of the col- 
or or art department. You know, one always hears about 
traveling salesman. Lois Tubbs and Mabel Sliedd are 
traveling saleswomen for the company; good luck to them. 
Duncan is a hard man to work for. His right-hand man, 
Warren Young, was constantly engaged in an argument 
with him. They both love the same girl, Natalie Maurer. 
She certainly has a good hold on their heart strings. 

There was one person present who looks on romance 
as wonderful, especially when the couple get married. 
Edwin Eandle, a minister, is always looking for business. 

Isabel Sanderson and Louise Gould have developed in- 
to very kindly individuals. They have established a home 
for well-to-do orphaned children. Their motherly in- 
stincts are guided by the size of the checks they receive. 

We will stroll for a moment from these scenes of rev- 
elry and view the scenes back-stage. 

The school boasts an efficient corps of engineers. 
Their knowledge of mechanics was acquired at dear old 
Waltham Vocational School. 

The corps was headed by Koger Henry, Morton Brown, 
Emeret Iodice, James Flynn, Melvin Dwyer, George Evans, 
Paul Eyan, Michael Caramencia; and Ansel Coombs com- 
pleted the personnel of the engineering corps. The pupils 
need never want for comfort. 

Amongst their midst I noticed a conspicuous figure; 
conspicuous because it was so out of place — Nellie Seward, 
dressed in the clothes of a missionary, was offering the 
men salvation for their lost souls. 

I was getting rather tired of all the confusion; so I 
selected a quiet corner and started to read a newspaper. 



22 THE MIRROR 

A certain article caught my eye. 

I neglected to tell you that our old friend Bill Stank- 
ard had been playing major-league baseball and had made 
good. Like all good players he had to give up some time. 
Bill had retired and is now manager of a team. 

The article told of Bill's team. The team is made up 
entirely of women (women never grow old). According 
to the article they are some players. The line up for the 
afternoon game was what struck my eye. 

Olive Mott, pitcher, and Arleen Morse, catcher, were 
an unbeatable combination. Dorothy Reynolds, at first 
base saved many a wild throw. 

Marion Slayton at second base was a bundle of "pep." 

Lorraine Brown at shortstop was in every play. 

Dorothy Martin held down her job at third base like 
a veteran. 

Marguerite Robertson in left-field was a real "fly 
hawk." 

Eva Mciiols the center fielder was always snatching 
flies out of the air. 

Martha Mattson, the right fielder, was the doom of 
every left-handed batter. 

Bill has certainly built up a wonderful team. 

The pictures of Katherine Nolan and Vivienne O'Clair 
were in the paper. They had just returned from Holly- 
wood. Shining stars, they are, their voices have that cer- 
tain quality that is so likable. 

Anna Weller, now the wife of Albert Anderson, played 
a few selections of the piano. "Andy" is a frankfurter 
manufacturer. He invented a nonskid hot dog. 

A word or two about some more of my classmates 
with whom I had a chance to talk. Robert Abrahamson 
and Lawrence Beal were pitiful figures. Their faces were 
downcast and they walked along like mechanical men. 
Large losses in the stock market had taken their last 
penny. Thomas Chapman was the lucky man and "social 
lion" of the evening. He had won thousands in stocks. 



THE MIRROR 23 

Allan Hurd, with his wife, the former Betty Anderson, 

was a perfect picture of joy. They were truly a beauti- 
ful pair. 

Ellsworth Spaulding was worthy of all the praise he 
had received. He invented a folding chair that really did 
fold, 

Olive Cunningham and Margaret Doyle were engaged 
in a risky occupation. They were bill collectors in the 
firm of "Canter and Collins. Lillian Canter and Catherine 
Collins were yeast cake manufacturers — quite a rise in 
life. 

"Dick" Mitchell has become quite a "snob". He is 
"stuck-up" as they say it in slang. His glue business has 
been quite a success. 

We must all deny ourselves something in this life, 
Margaret Gallant and Raymah Davis have denied themr 
selves all the luxuries of life. They, like Diogenes, are 
searching for an honest man. All I can say is "Good 
Luck to them." 

Rose Johansen and Louise Main are real pioneers. 
They are "Home-steading" in the wilderness of Lincoln. 
The raising of animals is their hobby — dandelions and 
snake grass. 

Some people live by their beauty. Eva Kramer and 
Dorothy Kittredge have won many prizes in bathing 
beauty contests. 

Gertrude McNamara, Susan Tortola, Marion Parkin- 
son, and Anna Martowski nearly spoiled the joy of the 
evening. They started a squabble over who was going to 
dance the next dance with John Mullen. John was a 
model for collar advertisements. He was a panic with 
the ladies. While the ladies were contesting over John he 
danced off with Beatrice Maines, whose name was now 
Mrs. Sousa. Paul Sousa was a "live wire" salesman. He 
sold window shades manufactured by Walter Jaynes. The 
shades were guaranteed not to snap up at the wrong 
moment. 



24 THE MIRROR 

Women play a big part in the life of the day. Man 
has fallen off his pedestal. 

Edna LaKosee, Kebecca Marcou, and Marie Marchetti 

were political figures of importance. They could swing 
the votes in any way that they pleased. 

I heard Mary Burke telling many interesting stories. 
She had just completed a tour of the country on a bicycle. 

Elinor Spencer and Mildred Vinal have wasted their 
lives in vain. They spent long hours searching through 
ancient documents looking for the secret of Cleopatra's 
beauty. 

Edith Kniznik was dreaded by small schoolboys. She 
was a music teacher and you know how much the small 
lad likes to take his music lesson. 

Audrey Wiley, ably assisted by Josephine Beninati, 
has taken advantage of one of the weaknesses of human 
beings. She runs a correspondence school where one is 
taught, in three lessons, to be master of any situation. 

Frederick Owen, with his wife, the former Virginia 
Betts, had to leave before the affair was over. Fred had to 
be up early the next morning. He was a milkman. 

Charles Annunciafca has risen to be quite a celebrity 
in the art world He portrayed the rather rare scene of a 
Scotchman throwing away dollar bills. 

Jeannette Allen, Irene Heinz, and Marjorie Bowers, 
three spinsters who live alone in a big house, were the real 
villains of the evening. They caught sight of William 
O'Dea and Walter Toney, the two icemen who had stolen 
a pie from their kitchen, and with vengeance in their eyes 
they gave chase to the poor men. 

The gathering was soon in an uproar and feeling that 
this was no place for me, I quietly slipped out of the side 
door. The moon was smiling down from the heavens. I 
stool still a moment lost in thought. I was thinking of 
a certain old school building and of the days when I was a 
school boy — 



Class of 1930 

Class Officers 




RICHARD WEAR 

Writer of the Class Will 



OLIVE MOTT 
Class Historian 




w 



THE MIRROR 25 

Class Will 

E, the Class of 1930, of the City of Waltham, County 
of Middlesex, and State of Massachusetts, being of 
sound mind, memory, and understanding, do make, pub- 
lish, and declare the following as for our last Will and 
Testament, that is to say: 

We hereby revoke all wills, codicils, or testamentary 
instruments by us at any time heretofore made. 

We give and bequeath to our beloved faculty a large, 
handsomely-framed portrait of Yale's most famous grad- 
uate, Rudy Vallee. We request that this picture be hung 
in Room 14. 

To the Class of 1931 we leave our class mascot, Jack 
Britt, trusting that they will cherish him as much as we 
did. 

We leave Mr. Hollis a class of nice, bright little III B 
boys, and to insure their proper behavior we will include 
a set of absolutely indestructible laboratory desks. Every 
chair will be provided with a strong chain, to which each 
pupil's book will be firmly attached. This, we hope, will 
effectively prevent these books from finding their way into 
obscure corners where frantic students may search for 
them in vain. 

To that powerful, heavily moustached gentleman 
from Room 5 we leave a pass to all wrestling matches to 
be held in Boston Garden during the coming year. This 
legacy is provisional upon his agreeing to desist from all 
jiujitsu exhibitions during the lunch hour. 

We hereby bequeath to the Household Arts Depart- 
ment a sum of money to be used for the purchase of ash 
trays. The gentlemen who have, in the past, paid little 
friendly visits to this department dislike having to throw 
their Cigarette and cigar ashes on the floor. 



26 THE MIRROR 

We bequeath Charles Carney ten gallons of ice cream 
in the hope that he will choke himself to death trying to 
swallow it in one gulp. 

Ellsworth Spaulding has so frequently expressed his 
desire to get away from the women that we leave him 
funds with which to organize an expedition to the South 
Pole. 

Colin Dale leaves his wing collar and spats to any of 
our younger generation who aspire to be big butter-and- 
egg men. 

We hear that Leonard Dubin — alias Lou Chaney, alias 
Leonardoff Boppofsky — intends to disguise himself as 
"Scarface Al" Capone and seek his fortune in Chicago. 
If this report turns out to be true, we direct our executors 
to send a large floral wreath for Boppofsky's funeral. It 
must never be said that the class of 1930 failed to recog- 
nize the budding genius of its own members. 

We hope that the future classes of Waltham High 
will study hard; that they will not crib German transla- 
tion books; that they will refrain from removing desk 
covers in Room 5; and that they will be careful to speak 
very clearly and distinctly while in Room 9. If they will 
do this, Philip Jackson agrees to use his influence with 
the faculty to obtain admission for them to all of the more 
select institutions of higher learning in the United States. 

We nominate and appoint the following as executors 
of this our last will and testament : George Perna, Samuel 
Milesky, and Charles Carney. To prevent this trio of in- 
ternationally known second-story workers from abscond- 
ing with the contents of the class treasury, we direct that 
they shall place bonds of one lead dime each. 

In Witness Whereof we have hereunto set our hand 
and seal in the City of Waltham this twentieth day of June 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
thirty. 

Class of 1930. 



THE MIRROR 



27 



The Most Popular Girl 
The Most Popular Boy 
The Most Useful Girl 
The Most Useful Boy 
The Best Natured Girl 
The Best Natured Boy 
The Most Studious Girl 
The Most Studious Boy 
The Best Looking Girl 
The Best Looking Boy 
The Most Athletic Girl 
The Most Athletic Boy 
The Class Clown 
The Best Actor 
The Best Actress 
The Class Baby 
The Best Dressed Girl 
The Best Dressed Boy 
The Brightest Social Light 
The Class Bad Man 



Edith Pierce 

William Pendergast 

Susan Tortola 

George Perna 

Beulah Long 

George La Porte 

Virginia Betts 

Richard Weare 

Marion Dart 

Arthur Logan 

Dorothy Ellison 

William Pendergast 

Chester Sheer 

Cleveland Thomas 

Dorothy Griswold 

Lorimer Hanselpacker 

Marion Ryan 

Colin Dale 

Lyman Bowker 

Philip Jackson 



28 THE MIRROR 

The Class History 



© 



HE Tercentenary! Just the name arouses our atten- 
tion. We are all interested in old costumes, old pic- 
tures, old furniture. Everybody is rummaging in attics to 
find something of the past to contribute to the present. 
And so was I searching in our storeroom one day, when I 
came upoix a small brass-bound trunk. For many years 
it had stood forgotten in a dark corner under the eaves. 
I lifted the dusty lid, hardly expecting to find anything of 
interest; and at first sight, indeed, it seemed to contain 
only some pictures; but tucked away in one corner was a 
sheaf of yellowed papers bound by a faded ribbon. Un- 
tying it, I found, to my amazement and delight, that I had 
discovered a document of extreme importance and of par- 
ticular interest to all of us. 

*.v. -V- Mt -Aft- Jf- 

TP W w ^P *JF 

September, 1627: We arrived at our new home, today, 
aftei a journey which seemed to cover years instead 
of months. Thou canst imagine the excitement and 
confusion of over two hundred people landing in a 
new country. Although the inhabitants here gave us 

a hearty welcome, they seemed somehow to show a 
feeling of aloofness. Perhaps we displayed too much 
our unfamiliarity with their customs. Oh, diary, 
everything seems so strange here that I wonder if we 
shall ever find happiness. Thou wilt have to wait for 
a description of thy home until we become settled. 

October: I fear I have neglected thee, diary, but I've had 
much to do. Thou poor thing, thou dost not even 
know as yet what thy home looks like. My first fore- 
bodings were ill-founded, it seems. The country is 
lovely though different from our old home. We have 



THE MIRROR 29 

to be careful, for if we should roam outside the pal- 
isade unguarded, we might find ourselves in the hands 
of Indians. Our life here is not much different from 
what it was before except that we have to work with 
greater diligence. Thou wouldst never know that this 
is the same place we landed at a month ago. All 
Freemen have labored to Winn comfort for us, the 
Carpenters and Smiths working especially hard. 

Novembers Some youths from Newtown came here today 
to vie with our young men for athletic honors. The 
contest waged furiously for some time, but at length 
our team won the victory. How we shouted and 
cheered, and how proud we are of our valiant heroes! 
Truly they are famed far and wide for their swiftness, 
courage, sureness, and never failing sportmanship. 

January, 1628 ; Oh, diary, we had our first town meeting. 
Everyone, even the women and maidens, attended. 
The most important business was the election of of- 
ficers. For president of the council, Donald Smith 
was chosen; for his deputy, Helen Sulmonetti; for 
recorder, Ruth Thompson; and for treasurer, Parker 

Reed. 

We are indeed fortunate in living in a colony 
where people are allowed such privileges as self gov- 
ernment and where the governor and elders do not 
restrain us as some do. They even believe, and right- 
ly too, that a little play does one no harm. Our mer- 
rymakings might shock some people who think that 
a proper conduct is one of prudery. 
March: Today, diary, the governor gave us permission 
to have what our English cousins call a party; what 
dost thou think of that? Oh, diary, I'm so thrilled 
over our first merrymaking in this country. 



30 THE MIRROR 

April: Well, diary, we had the party this evening, and I 
cannot go to bed without telling thee about it. Me- 
thinks it was the best time I ever had. Art thou not 
glad, diary, that thou didst not move to some sterner 
colony? 

June: Some of our friends left today. We were sorry to 
see them leave, for we have grown fond of them, al- 
though we stood in awe of them when we first knew 
them. Also we had news that a ship is leaving soon 
from England for our colony and will probably arrive 
the first of September. 

August Oh, diary, I never could have believed that such 
wonderful summers existed. Everything seems beau- 
tiful here. The gentle Hills and shady Lanes are 
somewhat like those in our old home, but most people 
think they are better, especially for moonlight strol- 
ling. Even the Crows and Frosts do not alter the 
beauty of our life. 

September: Didst thou know, diary, that a whole year 
has passed, and that yesterday the ship landed? How 
good it was to get news of our old friends, but some- 
how our life in the old country seems far past. Me- 
thinks I grow to love our home more every day; I 
hope the new colonists will like it too. 

November: We had our town meeting today. Angelo 
Perna was elected president of the council; Nell 
Cummins, his deputy; George Perna, recorder; and 
Kenneth Scanlon, treasurer; and so the old order 
changeth. 

May, 1629: Diary, we had just the best time tonight. We 
had the biggest party, and — I hardly dare tell thee — 
we danced! Art thou shocked, dearest diary? Aye, 
we actually danced, and fun it was, too. I hardly 
know whether it was the dancing that was fun, or 
whether it was the doing of something so unheard of 
in this country. A huge barn was decorated in our 






THE MIRROR 31 

colors of the gala occasion, and all were bedecked in 
their finest. The sight was one to he long remem- 
bered, and grateful we are to our governor for his 
permission and help. 

July: I hope thou art not wroth with me, diary, for neg- 
lecting thee. 'Tis shameful I well know, but I will 
try to make it up to thee now. Another party of our 
friends left a fortnight ago. The Godspeeds were 
hard to say, but our companions are gone, leaving an 
empty feeling in our lives. Oh, diary, why cannot 
people stay forever where they are happy? 

September: Diary, dost thou know what day this is? Of 
course thou knowest; 'tis thy second birthday, for 
thou wert started the day we landed here. Just think, 
for two years we have lived here, and now we are the 
senior members of the community. What a feeling 
of dignity one has when this position is gained. 

November: Our annual town meeting was held today. 
After the business had been attended to and our 
meager treasury accounted for, the election was held. 
The officers chosen were: president, Donald Smith, 
who has previously served us so well; deputy, Gladys 
Hamilton; recorder, Kenneth Scanlon; and treasurer, 
Marion Dart. 

December: We held a party all ourselves last evening, 
and danced again. We decided that Christmas time is 
best for merrymaking. Doth thy heart not feel light- 
er then, diary? Ours do; everyone declared the affair 
was the best ever held. 

January: Didst thou know, diary, that we have two or- 
ganizations in our community? One is the Dramatic 
Society, which mayhap will prove the making of some 
great actor or orator; who knows? Our own Cleve- 
land Thomas is now the president, and the members 
include some of our most distinguished citizens. They 
are ably directed by one of our elders and show much 



32 THE MIRROR 

talent. The other is the Commercial Club, whose 
leader is Kenneth Scanlon, our excellent recorder. Its 
members are well informed in the methods of business 
and plan to be our merchantmen of tomorrow. Both 
clubs do much to further our social life and give us 
many enjoyable occasions. 

February: Diary, didst thou know that there is such a 
place as Caney Creek? I didn't either, but today we 
had some visitors from that far land. We like them 
immensely; their talk was most amusing, too. They 
told us all about their homes, their schools, and the 
life they lead in the distant South. They have to work 
harder than we do, diary. Their soil is not so fertile, 
nor are their people so wealthy. I wish that we could 
often have such visitors bringing inspiration to us. 

March: At our meeting house a drama was given tonight 
by our ablest actors. Thou wouldst surely have been 
thrilled, diary. I can still hear the wild shrieks, the 
howling wind, and the pistol shots, and see the old 
hermit prowling mysteriously about. 

May: Much has happened this month. First was the 
music festival. The musicians of the surrounding 
communities gathered here for contest. Thou shouldst 
have heard the trumpets, the flutes, and the bass, and 
seen Master Milesky twirl bis baton in a manner 
marvelous to see. Soon after we were given a party. 
I cannot help being thankful that we live where we 
are allowed to enjoy life instead of walking always 
with downcast eyes and a subdued demeanor. 

June: Diary, thou art now to have a new home. 'I did 
not tell thee before because I like not to think of it 
myself. After all our happiness here, we are going to 
leave. Anyway, during our short stay here we have 
gained and given much. Who has contributed to our 
community's hall of fame? Who has ever produced 
such athletes as Miele, Cerry, Anderson, or Pender- 



THE MIRROR 33 

gast? Who has had such a leader as Donald Smith? 
Who has developed such a versatile actor and able 
editor as Cleveland Thomas? Who has had such 
scholars as we? But then, who ever had better elders 
or a wiser and more helpful governor than Master 
Burke? 

Oh, diary, I wonder what the future holds for us. 
Will it give us fame or wealth? Will it make us lead- 
ers of men? One thing I know it will always have in 
store for us — the happiness of remembering our life 
here. Always will that be a bright spot in our lives, 
and inspire us to better things. Always will our col- 
ors shine before us in the blue of the heaven and the 
gold of the sun. Always shall we remember the 
guiding words of our motto: "Deeds not words". 

Olive Mott 







THE MIRROR 
WALTHAM VS. SOMERVILLE 

April 12, 1930 
ALTHAM High dropped its baseball opener to Somer- 
ville by the somewhat liberal count of 12 to 8 at Dil- 
boy Post Field, Somerville. The local boys showed strong- 
est where they were supposed to be weak, but fell down in 
the departments of play where they were figured to excell 
in, so all in all it was quite a topsy turvy afternoon. 

Bill Pendergast, captain and all-scholastic possibility, 
lasted only four and a half innings before being knocked 
out of the box. Gustafson relieved him and was even worse, 
failing to stick it out two full innings. The summary: 



SOMERVILLE 


HIGH 






WALTHAM HIGH 








ab 


r 


bh 


pd 


a 


e 




ab 


r 


bh 


po 


a 


e 


Punzo cf 


5 


1 


4 





2 





Lane ss 


4 








1 


;» 





Vitello 3b 


3 


1 





1 


5 


2 


Carlson If 


3 








1 


1 


1 


Escott If 


5 


2 


2 


4 


2 





Gerrie lb 


5 





1 


8 








Bettencourt c 


3 


2 


3 10 


1 





Krol 3b 


5 


2 


2 





4 





Mahan lb 


4 


2 


3 


5 








Miele c 


5 


2 


3 


9 


1 





Donahue 2b 


1 








3 








Penderg't p ] 


rf 4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Chesterfield rf 3 


1 





1 








Greig 2b 


5 


2 


2 





1 





Moran 2b 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 





Anderson cf 


4 








3 








Jeremiah 2b 


1 














1 


Stankard rf 


2 





1 











McNamara ss 


3 





1 





1 





Winn rf 




















Cross p 


4 





1 


1 


2 





Gustafson p 


1 


1 


1 





1 





Lynch p 














1 





Martowski p 


1 





1 











Totals 


35 12 16 27 15 


3 


Totals 


39 


8 12* 


23 10 


2 



♦McNamara out in 7th, hit 
by batted ball. 



Innings 

Somerville 

Waltham 



123456789 
032021400 12 
000012140 8 



Runs batted in by Lane 1, 
Miele 2, Pendergast 1, Greig 1, 
Anderson 1, Stankard 1, Punzo 
1, Escott 1, Bettencourt 2, Ma- 
han 2, Moran 4, McNamara 1. 

Two base hits, Gustafson, Es- 
cott, Bettencourt, Mahan 

Home run, Miele. 
court 2. 



Sacrifice hits, Vitello, Ches- 
terfield, McNamara. 

Double plays by Escott to 
Vitello to Moran. 

Base on balls by Pendergast 
2, by Gustafson 2, by Cross 3, 
by Lynch 2. 

Struck out by Pendergast 4, 
by Gustafson 1, by Martowski 
2, by Cross 8, by Lynch 1. 

Passed balls, Miele 2. 

Hit by pitched ball, by Gus- 
tafson (Vitello.) 

Winning pitcher, Cross. 

Losing pitcher, Pendergast. 

Time: 2 hrs, 5 minutes. 

Umpire, J. W. Mooney. 

Stolen bases, Punzo, Betten~ 



THE MIRROR 
WALTHAM VS. MIDDLESEX 



35 






April 16, 1930 
ALTHAM High ran up against a real smoke screen 
and put in an ineffective afternoon trying to hit some 
mighty fast pitching before succumbing to the Middlesex 
School, 7 to 2, at the latter's diamond in Concord yester- 
day afternoon. Davis, Middlesex hurler, had burning 
speed and blinded the batters with his smoke ball. Pen- 
dergast lacked his usual stuff, and received quite a pound- 
ing from the jubilant Middlesex cuffers. He was nicked 
for 13 blows, including one triple and one double. Wal- 
tham's fielding, although ragged, produced two double 
plays. The summary: 



MIDDLESEX 


SCHOOL 




WALTHAM HIGH 








ab 


r 


bh po 


a 


e 




ab 


r 


bh po 


a 


e 


Black 3b 


4 


1 


1 


1 





Collura 3b 


4 


1 


2 








Lee 2b 


3 


1 


2 


2 





Gerrie lb 


3 





8 


1 





Holmes 2b 


2 





1 


1 





Krol rf If 


4 





1 








Nacey rf 


4 


1 


2 








Miele cf 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Doolittle ss 


4 





3 2 


2 





Pendergast p 


4 





1 


4 





Hollis lb 


4 





1 7 








Lane ss 


4 





1 2 


3 


2 


Borden cf 


3 


2 


1 2 








Carlson If 


1 














Thorn e 


4 





16 








Martowski rf 


1 














Prouty 


2 


2 


2 








Grieg rf 


3 








2 





Davis p 


4 














Doiran c 


4 





11 





3 


Totals 


34 


7 13 27 


6 





Totals 


31 


2 


3 24 11 


6 






Innings 




1234 5 6789 
















Middlesex 


21010012 — 7 
















Waltham 


10100000 — 2 













Runs batted in by Miele, 
Lane, Holmes 2, Hollis 2. 

Two base hit, Prouty. 

Three base hit, Nacey. 

Stolen bases, Collura, Gerrie, 

Sacrifice hit, Borden. 
Miele, Pendergast, Black, Doo- 
little 2, Borden 2, Prouty 3. 



Doubleplays, by Pendergast 
to Gerrie to Doiran, Miele to 
Lane. 

Base on balls by Pendergast 
3, by Davis 8. 

Struck out by Pendergast 9, 
by Davis 16. 

Wild pitch, Pendergast 1. 

Hit by pitched ball, by Davis 
(Miele) by Pendergast (Nacey) 

Time 1 hour 50 min. 

Umpire, Bulger. 



36 



THE MIRROR 



05 



WALTHAM VS. NORWOOD 
April 19, 1930 

ITH Krol on the mound, Waltham High turned over a 
new leaf in baseball album at the Norwood High field. 
Fighting back after two early setbacks had shattered all 
the championship hopes of a largely veteran team, Wal- 
tham swarmed all over their Norwood rivals and grabbed 
off a 12 to 6 decision. 

Krol was the star of this first local victory, for he 
gathered five base hits and struck out twelve men. Miele 
and Greig also hit fiercely. The summary: 



WALTHAM HIGH 



NORWOOD HIGH 



ab r bh po a e 



ab r bh po a e 



Lane ss 


5 


2 


2 11 





Zinkowsky cf 


4 





1 








Berrie lb 


5 





15 





Ellis ss 


4 





1 1 


2 


1 


Krol p 


6 


4 


5 1 





Keefe 2b 


1 








1 





Miele c 


5 


3 


4 12 


1 


Silverman If 


4 


1 


1 3 








Pendergast 


cf 3 


1 


5 





Kelly c 


5 


1 


2 13 


2 


1 


Greig 2b 


5 


2 


3 





Farioli lb 


4 





6 





1 


Carlson If 


5 





13 





Chubet 3b 


4 


1 


3 1 


1 





Stankard rf 


5 





110 





McTernan 2b ss 


3 


1 


1 2 


3 





Lando 3b 


1 











Dyer, rf 


4 


1 


1 








Allia 3b 


4 





10 2 


1 


Crimmins p 


2 











1 












Balutis p 





1 











Totals 


44 12 18 27 4 


2 


Totals 


35 


6 


9 27 


9 


4 






Innings 


123456789 
















Waltham 


10114032 — 12 
















Norwood 


01030000 2 — 6 













Runs batted in by Krol, 
Miele 2 Pendergast, Greig 6, 
Stankard, Allia, Zinkowski, 
Kelly, McTernan, Dyer, Crim- 
mins. 

Two base hits, Grieg, Chubet. 

Three base hits, Miele. 

Stolen bases, Krol, Greig, 
Stankard, Zinkowski, McTer- 
nan. 

Sacrifice hits, Pendergast, 
Zinkowski, Crimmins. 



Double plays by McTernan to 
Ellis to Farioli. 

Base on balls, by Krol 2, by 
Crimmins 2, by Balutis 1. 

Struck out by Krol 12, by 
Crimmins 10, by Balutis 3. 

Passed ball, Kelly. Wild 
pitch, Balutis. 

Hit by pitched ball, by Krol 
(McTernan, Balutis). 

Losing pitcher, Crimmins. 

Time: 2 hrs, 5 min. 

Umpire, J. W. Mooney. 



THE MIRROR 



37 






WALTHAM VS. BELMONT 

May 7, 1930 

ALTHAM featured the opening, of their home field 
schedule by putting the skids under Belmont High, 
13 to 4. The home boys had their hitting lens on, as a, 
total of 16 base knocks will prove. Razzmo Miele, who 
had been the heavy sticker all year, once again headed the 
list, for he walloped out two home runs in one game. Gus- 
tafson, Waltham's hurler, held Belmont to four blows, but 
Alexander of Belmont went to the showers in the fourth 
frame. The summary: 



WALTHAM HIGH 






BELMONT HIGH 








ab 


r 


bh 


po 


a 


e 




ab 


r 


bh 


po 


a 


e 


Collura 3b 


4 





1 


1 


3 





Pelleritti 2b 


4 








2 








Gerrie, lb 


5 


3 


4 11 








Anderson cf 


3 


1 





2 








Krol cf 


3 


3 


2 


1 








Pounder ss 


3 


1 


1 





3 





Miele c 


3 


4 


3 


8 


2 





Alexander p If 4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Smith rf 


5 





1 











King lb 


4 





1 


6 


1 





Maclver rf 











1 








Rundlett 3b 


4 





1 


1 


2 





Lane ss 


3 


3 


2 





3 


1 


DeStefano rf 


4 

















Grieg 2b 


5 





1 


2 


3 


2 


Pomponio If 

















1 


Carlson If 


4 





1 


2 








Murphy If 


1 








1 








Winn If 




















Howatt p 


2 











1 





Gustafson p 


4 





1 


1 


2 





Schultz c 


1 








4 






















Loomis c 


1 


1 





6 


3 


1 


Totals 


36 13 16 27 13 


3 


Totals 


31 


4 


4 24 11 


3 






Innings 




123456789 


















Waltham 


40302202 — 13 


















Belmont 


00030001 — 4 















Runs batted in by Krol, 
Miele 4, Smith 2, Lane 3, Greig, 
Carlson 2, Pounder, King 2, 
Rundlett. 

Two base hits, Gerrie, Carl- 
son. 

Home runs, Miele 2, Lane. 

Stolen bases, Collura, Gerrie, 
Krol 2, Miele, Lane 3, Greig, 
Anderson. 

Sacrifice hit, Krol. 



Base on balls by Gustafson 
2, by Alexander 1, by Howatt 
4. 

Struck out by Gustafson 9, 
by Alexander 3, by Howatt 5. 

Passed ball, Loomis, Wild 
pitch, Howatt. 

Hit by pitched ball by How- 
att (Miele) by Gustafson (An- 
derson). 

Losing pitcher, Alexander. 

Time lh. 55 min. Umpire, 
Forster. 



38 



THE MIRROR 



fi 



WALTHAM VS. NORWOOD 

May 10, 1930 
OR the fourth time in the past five years Waltham 
4™j and Norwood Highs have completed their baseball 
warfare for the season in a deadlock. Norwood High 
achieved this goal at the Athletic Field when it combined 
slick pitching with some timely hitting to gain a 6 to 1 
verdict, thus taking revenge for the 12 to 6 setback suf- 
fered in the opening game of the annual series at Nor- 
wood April 19. Waltham High completed its first triple 
play of the season in the first inning. The summary: 



NORWOOD HIGH 






WALTHAM HIGH 






ab 


r 


bh po 


a 


e 




ab 


r 


bh 


po 


a 


e 


Zinkowski cf 3 


2 


2 2 








Smith rf 


4 








3 








Ellis 2b 4 





2 


1 





Gerrie lb 


4 





1 


6 


1 





Silverman If 4 





2 2 








Krol p If 


4 





2 


4 


2 





Kelley c 4 





15 








Miele c 


4 





1 


9 








Farioli rf 4 





1 








Pendergast cf 


3 








2 








Chubet 3b 4 


1 


2 


2 





Lane ss 


4 











1 


1 


McTernan ss 4 


2 


1 2 


1 





Collura 2b 


4 





1 


2 


2 


1 


McDonoughlb 5 


1 


2 5 








Greig 2b 


3 











1 





Crimmins p 4 














*LeBrun 


1 



























Carison If 


1 


1 





1 








Totals 36 


6 1 


4 





Gustafson p 


1 





1 





















Martowski p 


1 


















Totals 34 1 6 27 7 2 

* Batted for Greig in 9th. 



Innings 

Norwood 

Waltham 



123456789 
02101200 — 6 
00100000 — 1 



Runs batted in by Miele, Sil- 
verman, Kelly 2, McTernan, 
McDonough,2. 

Two base hits, Collura, Ellis. 
Three base hits, Chubet. 
Stolen bases, Zinkowski 2, Kel- 
ly, Chubet, McTernan 3, Carl- 
son, Gustafson. 

Sacrifice hits, Silverman, 
Kelly. 

Triple play by Greig to Gerrie 



to Smith 

Bass on balls by Krol 5, by 
Crimmins 2. 

Struck out by Krol 5, by 
Gustafson 2, by Martowski 1, by 
Crimmins 15. 

Passed balls by Kelly 1, Miele 
1. 

Hit by pitched ball by Gus- 
tafson (Chubet) 

Losing pitcher, Krol. 

Time 2 hrs. Umpire Porster. 



THE MIRROR 
CHURCH LEAGUE— HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET 

May 9, 1930 



X 



N a thrilling meet where inches and points counted 
»g so vitally as to affect the entire outcome of the con- 
test, Waltham High dropped its opening dual track test 
by a single point to the combined strength of the Church 
League at the Athletic Field, 39 to 38. Victory by a size- 
able margin in the final event, the relay race, brought the 
schoolboys up to within a single point of the hostile total, 
just failing to bridge the gap that the church leaguers had 
fought so hard to gain amid stubborn opposition in every 
event. 

How the Points Were Split 

100 Shot Mile 220 BJ 880 HJ 440 Rel Tot 
Church League 86 3 81535 0—39 
High School 13 6 18464 5—38 







THE MIRROR 

Class Statistics 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ROBERT ABRAHAMSON 

Bob 

Farmer 

"Aw! Heck!" 

Baseball 

Bemis Aggie 



F. ADLER 

Speed 

To be a school teacher 

"Hello!" 

Doing nothing 

Who knows J 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ALBERT E. ANDERSON 

Andy 

Business executive 

"Hey, Walla!" 

Eating candy in English 

Bentley's Evening School 



CARL ANDERSON 

Andy 

To be in love 

"I says! How's the babyt" 

Tennis 

Ashman 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



CHARLES ANNUNZIATA 

Chick 

To graduate from Waltham's 

antique School House 
"Come on Kid" 
Kill time 



RALPH ANDREWS 

Raddy 

Aviator 

"Never" 

Study English 

Bemis Dental School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 
Nickname 
Ambition 
Favorite Expression 

Hobby 
Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 
Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



HOWARD BADGER 

Brute 

To get a "B" in English 

"Jumping Jeosephat" 

Golf 

Who knows ? 

JOHN BARTLEMAN 

Gabeldo 

To get a passing mark from 

Al 
Buggy riding 
Bemis Flying School 

LAWRENCE BEAL 

Lawry 

Pass a Latin College Board 



Harvard 

HENRY F. BOWERS 

Heindrick 

To be a lawyer 

"May I be excused V 

Tennis 

Boston University 

MORTON BROWN 

Fire Top 

To follow in Bonney's foot- 
steps 
"Aw- Wall!" 
Washing on his flivver 
Just ain't got any 

SAMUEL D. CAPLAN 

Zoom 

Anything that comes along 

"How's Your Uncle" 

Picking Daisys 

Bucksport Prep. 



FRED BARROWS 

Ted 

Travel 

"Listen" 

Work 

Bemis Beach 

LOUIS BARTLEMAN 
Bart 

"Who Cares?" 

S. A. W.v 

Next stop 

NORMAN BONNEY 

Barney 

Motor cycle racer 

"Do me a favor" 

Shining his motor cycle 

Franklin County, Maine 

LYMAN A. BOWKER 

Bow 

To make money 

"Hy Kid" 

To ride two horses 

Out west 

NICHOLAS 

CANNISTRARO 

Nick 
Cellist 

"Oh, Oh" 

Music 

Undecided 

MICHAEL CARAMANICA 

Nick 

Printer 

"I'll Take Mustard" 

Baseball 

Work 



THE MIRROR 



41 



Name 

Nickname 
Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



PAUL CARLSON 

Chick 

To be an aviator 

"Hi, Kid" 
Golf 
Kelly Field 



CHARLES KENNETH 

CARNEY 
Dead Eye 
To get a dead lock on "Al" 

Hodge 
"Sho Sho!" 
Killing "Ben" Young 
Tufts 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ALFONSE CASTELLANO 
Al 

Undecided 
"Oh, Yeah!" 
Football 
Boston University 



DUNCAN CHAPMAN, JR. 

Chappy 

Flagpole champion 

"Yes, Sure, Certainly" 

Spelling 

Jail 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



THOMAS CHAPMAN 

Titer 

Orchestra player 

"Two or Three Times" 

Saxophone player 

Who knows 



PHILIP CLARK 

Phil 

Undecided 

"Huh" 

Music 

Mass. Agricultural College 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 
Destination 



ANSEL B. COOMBS 

Red 

Own an A. & P. Store 

"Bottle of Ketchup, and 

Make It Snappy" 
Cleaning Jakie's Flivver 
Printer, Grocer 



JAMES W. CROWE 

Jimmie 

To be a bookkeeper 

"Kybo" 

Basketball 
Work 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LOLIN FREDERICK 

JOSEPH DALE 
Hie 
Second story worker 

Poker 

Sing Sing Tech. 



EARL DEWAR 

Lefty 
Golf 



No where 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LEONARD DUBIN 

Pro, Bopo, Lenny 

Brain specialist 

"Huh? What?" 

Golf 

Quien Sabe? 



MELVIN W. DWYER 

Big Six 

Radio mechanic 

"Beans" 

Tinkering with radios 

Federal Radio School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



BARTON ELDRIDGE 

Bunny 
Banker 
"I'm Getting Old" 

None 

Boston University 



CHARLES ELLIOT 

Eggs 

C P. A. 

"How Do You Do It" 

Lending Money 

B. U. 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GEORGE EVANS 
King George 
President of U. S. 
"Ya Big Bum" 
Music 
Waverley 

ALFRED H. FREEMAN 

Al 

To give A. T. H. a beel 

headlock 
"Jingoes" 

Studying Mr. W's English 
Bemis Tech 



ROBERT E. FERRICK 

Bunny 

is my middle name 

"What Did Ya Say?" 

Golf 

Roberts 

EDWARD FURBUSH 

Bushy 
Accountant 

"Got a Cigarette?" 

Loafing 

Duke University (C. B. A.) 



42 



THE MIRROR 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 
Destination 



JAMES FYNN 
Huck 
Carpenter 
"Happy" 

Sports 

Bemis Navy Yard 



GEORGE GANNON 

Spud 

Accountant 

"Well, For Crying Out 

Loud" 
Collecting money 
Boston University C. B. A. 

(eventually) 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



WILLIAM GERRIE 

Bill 

To be President of the U. 

"No" 
Athletics 
U. S. Senate 



PAUL HALLERAN 

Tiny 

Two gun man 

"Let's Have It" 

Baseball games 

Somewhere 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LORIMER 

HANSELPACKER 

Hansie 

Millionaire, to be a 

"Scram" 

School 

Chicago 



ROGER HENRY 

Rodds 

Expert greaser 
"That Wasn't Me" 
Hunting for a job 
To see Paris 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



DONALD HILLS 

Bunker 

C. P. A. 

"Shavings" 

Tennis 

Eventually to Bentley's 



WILBUR W. HORNBECK 

Wilkie 

Business of my own 

"Sez You" 

Golf 

Wall Street 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



HERMAN INGBER 

Go places and do things 

"How Absurt!" 

Philandering 

"At the sign of the Palette" 



EVELYN IODICE 

Judice 

Mechanic 

"Oh, Oh!" 

Riding 

Newton Nut House 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



RENATO IODICE 

Reggy 

Take 2 rounds out of Hodge 

"I Didn't Do It" 

Work 

Who knows 



PHILIP JACKSON 

Phil 

To write a "Best Seller" 

"Bah" 

Procrastination 

White House 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



WALTER JAYNES 

Walla 

Mechanical engineer 

"None of Your Business' 

Tennis 

Northeastern 



ROBERT JOHNSON 
Bob 

Business man 

"Got Your Latin Done?' 

Williams 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ALEX KANN 

Aleque 

Flagpole sitter 
"HI Froot" 
More studying 
Northeastern 

WALTER LANE 

Walla 

President 

"Hey, Andy" 

Chewing gum 

Big League (Ha!) 



STANLEY KROL 
Rube 

"Hello Kid" 
Athletics 



ALFRED LANGILL 

Al 

To memorize L' Allegro 
"How's Tricks" 
Bumming sandwiches 
Mass. Nautical School 



THE MIRROR 



43 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GEORGE LAPORTE 

To get prosperous 
"Jinges 
Athletics 
Bucksport 



ARTHUR LOGAN 

Witch 

Join Company "F" 

"Take Care" 

Athletics 

Bemis 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ELTON MACFARLANE 

Mac 

No ambition 

"Is Zot So?" 

Horses 

California 



TAMES MACMILLAN 

Dogie 

To be a captain on a liner 

"Dat's Okay 

Ushering 

Mass. Nautical Training Ship 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



JOHNNIE MAY 

Johnnie 

To be a filibuster 

"To Have and To Hold* 

Getting excused 

Prep School 



J. WILLIAM 

MCDERMOTT 

Sciffy 

Chemist 

"How Far Down" 

Baseball 

Bleachery ' 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ROBERT MCKENNA 
Bob 

Junkman 

"Hi Froot" 

Second story worker 

Westboro 



RAYMOND MCKENZIE 

Applejack 
Join the Navy 
"Says You" 
Unknown 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ALDEN MCLASKEY 

Mack or Slim 

To sail on the high seas 

"Baloney" 

Hunting and fishing 

New Hampshire University 



MILLARD MERRYMAN 

Merry 

To graduate 

"No Percentage" 

Work 

California 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



SAMUEL MILESKY 

Miles 

Second story worker 

"Don't Be Like That" 

Walking 

P. G. 



ALESSANDRO MIELE 

Razzmo 

To have a good time 

"Let's Bum a Ride" 

To ride a horse 

To go to heaven 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



HOWARD E. MILLEN 

Uk 

Chemist 

"Oh! Oh!" 

Basketball 

P. G. or Tuft! 



RICHARD MITCHELL 

Mitch, Dick, Mike 

None 

"Well, I'll be—" 

Using expression 

Find the lost chord 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 



Hobby 
Destination 



FELIX MOBILIA 

Figgie 
Musician 



Favorite Expression "Gosh" 



Pianist 



JOHN E. MULLEN 

Johnny 

To be Pres. of Acme Rubber 

Crowbar Corp. 
"Oy, I Could Sme-sh Ya" 
Mild — yes, and yet, They 

Satisfy 
Hades 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



THOMAS J. MURPHY 

Doc 

To be a sport writer 

" W-w-w-w-why V 

Golf and Ping Pong 
Idono, Tellme? 



IRVING NORMAN 

Commercial artist 
"Y I S'pose" 
Drawing 



44 



THE MIRROR 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



WILLIAM ODEA 

Bill 

Electrician 

"Rome Wasn't Built in a 

Day" 
Reading 



FREDERICK W. OWEN 

Fred 

To be a millionaire 

"Mammy! " 

Work and how to duck it 

How original 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



DONALD PELKEY 

Don 

To be a Mexican 
"Let's Go Swimmin' " 
To ride three horses 
Braves Field 



WILLIAM 

PENDERGAST 

Brother 

Join the Navy 

"Take Care" 

Athletics 

Work 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GEORGE D. PERNA 

Henry, Peters, Bosco, Speed 
To do away with time-pieces 
"I Hate Women, Bah!" 
Playing the women 
Law school 



JOHN GILBERT 

PETERSON 
Gil 
C. P. A. 

"Sho! Sho!" 
My Ford 
Bentley's 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



RICHARD PONTZ 

Dick 

C. P. A. 

"Get' Out Of Here" 

Basketball 

Antioch 



JOHN QUIGLEY 

Quig 

To make $1,000,000 

"Scram" 

Collecting steamrollers 

California 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 
Hobby 

Destination 



EDWIN RANDLE 

Ed 

To own a Packard 

"Aw, Come An Let's Park" 
Pulling Fords Apart 

Waltham Watch Factory? 



STETSON M. RISDON 

Spooky 

To see Carney lick Mr. 

Hodge 
"By Gum and Ginger" 
Walking, swimming, chewing 

gum 
U. S. Coast Guard Officer's 

Training Academy 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



SALVATORE RIZZO 
Dodo 

To win the Basketball Cham- 
pionship 
"Thanks — Keep the Change" 
Basketball 
Bentley's 



CHESTER RUSSELL 

Chet 
Engineer 

"Heigh-oh" 

Boats 

Northeastern 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



PAUL RYAN 
Rosy 

To build a new high school 

"I'll Have Spinach" 

Basketball 

Bemis Naval Academy 



KENNETH J. SCANLON 

Red 

C. P. A. 

"Hey! 

Aviation 
Bentley's 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



CHESTER M. SHEER 

Gumpy, Ben Hur 

Commercial Artist 

"Sho! Sho!" 

Music 

Wagner Art School of Boston 



PAUL J. SOUSA 

Scout 

To be a success 

"Uh-Huh" 

Driving 

Any where 



THE MIRROR 



45 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ELLSWORTH 
SPAULDING 

Al 

To get a reputation 
"Let's Co-operate" 
Playing piano 
California, U. S. C. 

WILLIAM STANKARD 

Bill 

To succeed 

"You're Looking Good" 

Athletics 



EDWARD B. TATELMAN 

Titty, Ed. 

Financier 

"I Don't Know" 

Tennis 

Undecided 

WALTER E. TONEY 

Wallie 

Horticulturalist 

"Pinch the Guy Ahead" 

Study of Nature 

M. A. C. 



RICHARD WEAR 

Dick 

Street cleaner 

"For the Love of Aunt 

Jemima 
Second story worker 
Waverley Academy 



DONALD H. SMITH 

Binker 

A happy life 

"Hold Up" 

Athletics 

College 



MALVERN TASKER 

Mai 

Crack salesman 
"Youse Rat" 
Dancing, etc. 
It maybe hot 

CLEVELAND THOMAS 

Beauty 

To grow a mustache like 

Bowker's 
"What the Heck!" 
Star gazing 
Hades 



CARL UHLIN 

Swede 

Manager of Department Store 

"I'm Disgusted" 

Tennis 

Boston University 

THOMAS R. WEBBER 
Ducky 

None 

"Are You Telling Me?" 

Golf 

The far West 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



CLIFTON WINN 

Gibby 

Flagpole climber 

"Sure" 

Fishing 

Bemis Academy on the Mystic 



WARREN YOUNG 

Twoff, Pansy 

Pick and shovel 

"Boo Boo Da Da Boop' 

Horses 

Tufts 



46 



THE MIRROR 



GIRLS 



Name 
Nickname 
Ambition 

Favorite Expression 
Hobby 
Destination 



ETHEL A. AFFLECK 

Secretary 
"Don't Ask" 
Reading 
Secretarial School 



JEANETTE ALLEN 
Wee 



Sports 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ELIZABETH ANDERSON 
Betty 

"I Don't Know" 

Tennis 

Simmons College 



POMONA SYLVIA BALL 

Naturalist 

"The Cat's Pyjamas" 

Pets 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LORETTA REGINA BAR- 
BARICK 

Kid 

To lead the life of Riley 

"No Really." 

Any sport — tennis, basket-ball 

dancing 
Sargent School 



GRACE BARRETT 

Toots 

To be a nurse 

"Beat the Cars." "Check and 

Double Check." 
Reading 

Massachusetts General Hospi- 
tal Training School 



Name 

Nickname 
Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GWENDOLYN A. BAX- 
TER 

Gwen 

To mend broken hearts and 

bodies 
"For Cat's Sakes" 
Dreaming 
Hospital — Heaven 



JOSEPHINE BENINATI 

Joe 

Private Secretary 

"I'll see you tomorrow! ! 

Dancing 

As high as I can go 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



VIRGINIA BETTS 

Gin 

To teach 

"You Don't Mean It" 

Jackson College 



MARJORIE BOWERS 
Madge 

Secretary 
"Says You" 
Talking 
Florida 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



DOROTHY BROWN 

Brownie 

None 

"You Would" 

Going places 

Boston 



LORRAINE D. BROWN 

Skinny 

Nurse 

"Oh My Cow!" 

Talking 

Waltham Training School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



MARJORIE BROWN 

Marge 
Graduate 
Just Anything 
Drive an automobile 
Leslie School 



LILLIAN CANTER 

Lil 



"No!" 

Doing things 
Somewhere 



MARY P. BURKE 

Pat 

Teacher of Business 

"Huh!" 

Dancing 
Salem Normal 



GEORGIA ELIZABETH 

CARPENTER 
Betty 

To sleep till 8:00 
"Aw Gee" 
Opportunity Classes 
Art School 



THE MIRROR 



47 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



HARRIETTE MARY 
CARTER 

Hat 

Stenographer 
"Ditto— Ow- Wan" 
Reading 
Heaven 



ELSIE MAE CHENEY 

El 

Interior Decorator 

"Oh Yeah!" 

Dancing 

Art School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



PASQUALINA 

CIARLETTA 
Pat 

To be a bookkeeper 
Yah Tomorrow 
To be alone 
Not far 



IRENE CLARK 



Stenographer 

"Or Something" 

Dancing 

Some other school 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LOIS R. CLARK 

Snip 

Nurse 

"Oh, Hang" 

Studying house plans (?) 

Deaconess Hospital 



EDITH A. CLARKSON 

Edie 

Office work 

"For Crying Out" 

Dancing 

Anywhere 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GERTRUDE COLBURN 

Gertie 

To work in a private office 

"Write It On Ice" 

Reading 



CATHERINE COLLINS 
Kay 

Chauffeuress 
"Do You Think So?" 
Driving, Dancing 
Last Stop 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ELEANOR COSTELLO 

El 

To learn to play golf 

"I'se Regusted" 

Bowling 



NELLE M .CUMMINS 

School ma'am 
"My Conscience!" 
Dancing 
Syracuse University 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



OLIVE J. CUNNINGHAM 

Blondie 

See America First! 
"Oh! Oh!" 
Reading 

Private Secretary to the Pres- 
ident of U. S. 



ANNA T. BALEY 

Smiles 

Travel 

"Oh! Yah!" 

Dancing 

Heaven 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



MARION DART 

None 

Private Secretary 

"And What I Mean!" 

Dancing 

Katherine Gibbs School 



RAYMAH DAVIS 

None 

To get "A" in chemistry 

"How Do You Do This?" 

Swimming 

Hades (Heavens knows where) 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 
Destination 



MARY DE COSTE 

Haven't any 

To refrain from talking 

"How Is Your Mother 

Soap?" 
Golfing 
A Golf course 



DOROTHY 

DERBYSHIRE 
Derby 

To do something 
For ? 

Swimming 

Physical Education School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



MARGARET DOYLE 

Peggy, Dimples 

To be unsophisticated 

"Oh, You Would!" 

Housework 

Heaven (Maybe) 



DOROTHY MORGAN 

ELLISON 
Cowboy 

Latin? ? ! ! * * 
"Because Why? 
Athletics 
Waverley 



4S 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



THE MIRROR 

HELEN ENGLUND 

Heavy 

To be successful 

"Oh! Yeah!" 

Talkies 



RUTH FEENEY 

Dink 

A successful Dancing Teacher 

"For Cry Eye" 

Sports 

1 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ISABEL FINNEGAN 

Issie 

Learn how to play tennis 

"Now Why Bring That Up' 

Walking 

Nurses' Training School 



MABEL FROST 

May 

Be successful 

"Tsk! Tsk!" 

Winter sports 

Some other school 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



MARGARET MARY 
JANE GALLANT 
Peg 

Pedagogue 
"Etc." 
Dogs and Cats 



ELIZABETH M. 

GANNON 
Betty 

Secretary 
"My Dear!" 
Drawing 
Art School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



BERNICE GORDON 

Bunny 

Stenographer 

"My Word!" 

Writing shorthand notes 

Heaven 



ELEANOR H. GOUGH 

Private Secretary 
"Who Said So?" 
Dancing 
Burdett College 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LOUISE GOULD 

Weezie 

To be head-keeper at Wa- 

verley 

"Where's Laura" 

Studying 

Boston City Hospital 



OLIVE GRENIER 

Skippy 

Private Secretary 

Haven't any 
Music 
Don't know 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



DOROTHY 

GRISWOLD 

Lefty ; Dot 

"No Foolin'!" 

Dramatics 

Working in the 5 and 10 



AUGUSTA HAGERTY 

Gussie 

School Teacher 

"Hey" 

Going to Movies 

Normal School 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ELSIE HAINES 

Els 

To be successful 

"Hey, Mabel" 

Now and then a dance 

Some school 



CATHERINE HALEY 

Kay 

Europe (N. H.) 

"Really" 

Going places 

P. G. 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



GLADYS V. HAMILTON 

Granny 

Just a li'l secret 

"Ain't It Fierce!" 

Sports 

I'll bite! 



IRENE HEINZ 

Aramis * 

To be as good a detective as 

Mr. Hodge 
"Oh Dear" 

Trying to reform Porthos 
Fitchburg Normal 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



RUTH HENRY 

Ruthie 
Teacher 
"Uh Huh 
Tennis 
Framingham 



GENA HIGGINS 

Jinks 

To complete school 

"Oh! No!" 

Ice skating 

Somewhere better 



THE MIRROR 



49 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



EILEEN HILL 

Bobby 

I won't tell 

"What!" 

Writing letters 

Hard cold world 



EDITH L. HUGHES 

Fitz 

To raise muskrats 

"Hullo" 

Boys 

Ecole de Beaux Arts 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ROSE JOHANSEN 

Joe 

Swimming instructor 

"Oh Oh!" 

Swimming 
Lake Walden 



EDITH A. KNIZNIK 
Dede ; Dee 

Private Secretary 
"Oh, Gee!" 
Scout work 
Boston University 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



DOROTHY KITTREDGE 
Dot 

To have teachers stop pick- 
ing on me 
"Bizarre" 
Bowling 
Hospital 



EVA KRAMER 

To graduate 

"Like Nobody's Business' 

Movies 

In a far off land 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



HELENA LANCASTER 

Julie 

Concert work 
"Oh, Jiggers" 



EDNA LAROSEE 

Eddie 
Secretary 
"Uh-Uh" 
Nash roadster 



MARIE LASKE 
Ree 

None 
"Gosh" 
Going places 
Boston 



BEULAH V. LONG 
Tubby 

Nurse 

"I Couldn't Imagine" 

Going places 

Posse-Nissen 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



LOUISE MAIN 

Lou 

To do more studying 

"Watch Out Behind" 

Horse back riding 

A hospital 



BEATRICE A. 
Bea 

To be a success 
"Oh Yea!" 
Tennis 



MAINES 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



MARJORIE MANNING 
Marge 
To conquer 
"What's the Matter" 
Piano playing 

New England Conservatory of 
Music 



MARIE MARCHETTI 

Tina 

Secretary 

"You Don't Say!" 

Sewing 

Travel 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



REBECCA MARCOU 

Becky 

Secretary 

"Oh! Really" 

Dancing 

Nor Far? 



DOROTHY MARTIN 

Dorry 

Sec. to movie actress 

"Ogeeogosh!" 

Collecting class pictures 

Ask me. I don't know 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



ANNA MARTOWSKI 

Ski 

Secretary 

"Oh! Yah! 

Doing things 

Anywhere 



MARTHA MATTSON 



To get rich quick 

"Honest?" 

Cuba 



50 



THE MIRROR 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 
Ambition 



Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



NATALIE LOUISE 
MAURER 

Nat 

Own a sport roadster 

"My Word" 

Bridgewater Normal 

ISABEL MEADER 
Isie 

No work 

"Isn't that Pcutrid?" 

Psychology 

Jackson College 

LAURA MITCHELL 

Lonny 

To reform Louise 

"Oh, Yeah!" 

Camp Fire Girls 

Bridgewater Normal School 

OLIVE MOTT 



To get a job 



"De-Oh" 

It isn't studying 

The Old Grind 

EVA NICHOLS 

Stenographer 

"Oh-Oh" 

Writing notes in shorthand 

Heaven ' 

KATHERINE NOLAN 

Miss Nolan 

Walk to Waverley 

"What a Riot" 

Dancing 

Franklin Park Zoo 

MARION PARKINSON 

None 

Stenographer 
"No" 
Reading 
Some where 

EVELYN F. POWERS 

To do nursing 

"There's no time like the 
present" 

Church Music 

Registered Nurse in a Hospi- 
tal 

DOROTHY REYNOLDS 
Dot 

Nurse 

"Oh, Really!" 

Dancing 

Unknown 

MURIAL RIPPIN 
Rip 

"Maybe" 
I'll bite 



GERTRUDE MCNAMARA 

Tudie 

Secretary 

"Oh my Stuz" 

Reading 



RUTH MELANSON 

Ruthie 

Marriage 

"Wait till I tell you" 

Dancing 

Heaven 

ARLEEN L. MORSE 

To be happy 

"No Kidding — Really" 

Dancing 

Framingham Normal 

PEARL ASTRID 

NELSON 
Pan 

To have some of the teacher's 
children when I am teach- 
ing Kindergarten 

"Uh-Uh" 

Contesting in contests 

Perry Kindergarten Nor. Sch. 

FRANCES W. NICHOLS 

Tig 

To defeat Nick 

"Even tho' you lose" 

Collecting Dogs 

Skidmore 

MARTHA OSTRAND 

Mar tie 

Buying 

"Really?" 

Tagging along 

I wonder 

EDITH PIERCE 

Edie 

Stenog. 

"Cor — ker" 

Just doing things 

Nobody knows 

FRANCES REGAN 

Fran 

As high as I can get 
"O My Cat!" 
Dancing and Drawing 

Some office 



DENA RICCIATO 
Dee 

Stenographer 
"Yumpin Yellyfishes" 
Flying 
The Navy 

MARGUERITE 

ROBERTSON 
Bea 

To find the only one' 

"So's this" 

Dancing 

Anywhere 



THE MIRROR 



51 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 
Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 



Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 
Nickname 
Ambition 

Favorite Expression 
Hobby 
Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 

Name 

Nickname 

Ambition 

Favorite Expression 

Hobby 

Destination 



VIRGINIA RUSSO 

Porthos 

To be witty 

"My Word! How I hate My 

face" 
Homework 
Most any place 

ISABEL SANDERSON 

Sandy 

Secret 

"You Sinner!" 

Horses 

Any where 

NELLIE M. SEWARD 

Becky 

Director of Religious Educa- 
tion 

"For Pete's Sake" 

Music 

Gordan College of Theology 
and Missions 

HAZEL M. SINCLAIR 

Athos 

To teach 

"You Poor Pill!" 

Reading 

X — Unknown quantity 

ELINOR SPENCER 

El 

Private Secretary 

"Oh Yeah!" 

Dancing 

Business College 

HELEN SULMONETTI 

Smiles 
Teacher 
"Oh Yeah" 
Smiling 
Framingham 

SARAH THURSTON 

Absolutely none 

"For the Love of Lindbergh" 

Movies 

Normal School 

LOIS A. TUBBS 
Tubby 
Dietician 
"Oh! Oh!" 
Dancing 

Boston School of Domestic 
Science 

ANNA M. WELLER 

Ann 

To find the right one 

"Oh, Yah!" 

Dancing 

Just any where 

HELEN WINGATE 

Graduate in 1930 
"No Kidding" 

Chandler's Secretarial School 



MARIAN RYAN 



"Not Really" 

Just being there 
Training School 



EILEEN SANGELEER 

I 

Dental Assistant 

"And How" 

Dancing 

Byrd's Flying Secretary 

MABEL SHEDD 

Mabelena 

Return to future generations 

the "call downs" we have 

had 
"My Land!" 
Walking 
Normal School 



MARION SLAYTON 

Dietition 
"No Fooling" 
Most anything 
Framingham Normal 

CAROLYN SNOW 

Private Secretary 
"O-Yeah" 
Dancing 
Burdett College 

RUTH MCANN 
THOMPSON 
Ruthie 

To get in by 11 o'clock 
"All Men Are Liars" 
Gold Digging 
Heaven 

SUSAN TORTOLA 

Sue 

Secretary 

"Sho-Sho-" 

Sewing 

Travel 

MILDRED VINAL 

Millie 

To get a position 

"Oh! for Goodness Sake' 

Dancing 

Heaven 



AUDREY WILEY 

Aud 

Nurse 

"You'd be Surprised" 

Movies 

Simmons 



52 



THE MIRROR 



SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 



ETHEL A. AFFLECK 

Bowling 3. 

JEANETTE ALLEN 

Candy Girl, Senior Play ; 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; 
Bowling, 3. 



BETTY ANDERSON 

Basketball, Hockey. 

POMONA S. BALL 

Best Original Poster 
Prize, 2. 



LORETTA 

BARBARICK 

Field Hockey Team, 1, 2, 
3 ; Basketball Team, 
1, 2, 3; Baseball 
Team, 1, 2; Tennis, 2, 
3; Volley Ball, 3; 
Bowling, 3 ; Red Cross 
Committee, 1, 3; Dra- 
matic Club, 1, 2. 



GWENDOLYN 
BAXTER 

Dramatic Club. 



GRACE BARRETT 

Literary Editor of Mir- 
ror, 2, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, 2, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club Play, 2; Gym 
Meet, 2. 



JOSEPHINE 
BENINATI 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Baseball, 1. 



VIRGINIA BETTS 

Monitor. 



MARJORIE BOWERS 

Commercial Club, 3. 

LORRAINE D. BROWN 

Basketball Team, 1, 2; 
Clothing Committee 
Exhibit, 2; Monitor. 

LILLIAN CANTER 
Commercial Club, 3; 

Football Usher, 3 ; 

Candy Committee, 

Senior Play, 3. 



HARRIETTE MARY 
CARTER 

Commercial Club, 3 ; 
Football Usher, 3. 



ELSIE MAE CHENEY 
Red Cross Representative ; 

Composed School 

Football Song. 



PASOUALINA 
CIARLETTA 

Commercial Club, 3. 



LOIS R. CLARK 

Social Committee, 2, 3 : 
Mirror Staff, 1. 



EDITH A. CLARKSON 

Room Basketball, 2 ; Base- 
ball ; Bowling, 3 ; 
Commercial Club. 



GERTRUDE COLBURN 

Red Cross Committee ; 
Alumni Committee 

Commercial Club ; 

Commercial Club. 



NELLE M .CUMMINS 

Senior Dance Committee ; 
Senior Play Cast, 
Vice-Pres., 2; Class 
Basketball Team, 1, 2, 
3 ; Class Basketball 
Captain, 2, 3 ; Varsity, 
2, 3; Gym Meet, 2, 3. 



OLIVE J. 

CUNNINGHAM 

Football Usher, 2, 3; 
Commercial Club, 2, 
3 ; Candy Girl Senior 
Play, 3 ; Senior Dance, 
Committee, 3 ; Assem- 
bly Committee, ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3. 



MARION DART 

Second Varsity Hockey, 
1 ; Football Usher, 2, 
3; Gym Meet, 1, 2, 
3 ; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, 2; Senior 
Dance Committee, 3 ; 
Senior Class Auditor, 
3. 

RAYMAH DAVIS 
Bowling, 3 ; Tennis, 1. 



MARGARET DOYLE 

Commercial Club, Social 
Service Committee, 3. 



HELEN ENGLUND 

Hockey, 2, 3; Basketball, 
2, 3 ; Tennis Tourna- 
ment, 2, 3. 



MABEL FROST 

Operetta, 2 ; Football 
Usher, 3; Class Bowl- 
ing Team, 3 ; Class 
Baseball, 2. 



ELIZABETH M. 
GANNON 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Senior Play Commit- 
tee, 3; Operetta, 1. 



BERNICE GORDON 

Commercial Club, 3. 

ELEANOR H. GOUGH 
Member of Red Cross 
Committee, 2. 



OLIVE GRENIER 

Alumni Committee Com- 
mercial Club ; Com- 
mercial Club, 2 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 ; Ten- 
nis, 2. 

DOROTHY 

GRISWOLD 

Committee of Sophomore, 
I ; Junior, 2, Senior, 
3 ; Social Senior Play, 
Capt. Soph. Hockey 
Team, Literary Edi- 
tor, Jokes Editor v Mir- 
ror. 

GLADYS HAMILTON 

Vice-President Class', 3 ; 
Senior Play, Social 
Committee, 3 ; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 
3 ; Chairman Assem- 
blies ; Commercial 
Club, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, Red Cross Com- 
mittee, 2 ; Monitor, 
Mirror Room Report 
er, 2; Class Day Com- 
mittee, 3 ; Football 
Usher. 



THE MIRROR 



53 



ELSIE HAINES 

Senior Play Committee, 3 ; 
Class Baseball, 2; 
Football Usher, 3. 



CATHERINE HALEY 

Membership Committee of 
Commercial Club. 



IRENE HEINZ 

Dramatic Club. 



MARJORIE MAINES 
Tennis, 2; Sold Candy- 
Senior Play, 3 ; Bas- 
ketball, 3 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 3. 



MARJORIE MANNING 
Orchestra, 1, 2; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 ; Social 
Service Committee cf 
Commercial Club, 3 : 
Football Usher, 3. 



ARLEEN L. MORSE 
Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 
Senior Play Commit 
tee ; Football Usher 
Senior Play Commit 
tee ; Dramatic Club 
2, 3 ; Tennis, 2 , 
Bowling, 3 ; Gym 
Meet, 1, 2, 3; Dra- 
matic Club Social 
Committee. 



RUTH HENRY 

Committee Soph. Social ; 
Junior Prom Commit- 
tee ; Senior Dance 
Committee ; Mgr. Bas- 
ketball ; Exchange Ed- 
itor Mirror. 



GENA HIGGINS 

Baseball, 1, 2; Operetta, 
1, 2; Basketball 
Team, 1, 2; Football 
Usher, 2, 3 ; Candy 
Girl Senior Play, 2, 
3 ; Bowling, 2, 3. 



EILEEN HILL 

Football Usher, 3 ; Candy 
Girl Senior Play, 3; 
Alumni Committee ; 
Chairman , Pin Com- 
mittee, Commercial 
Club, 3. 



EDITH A. KNIZNIK 

Junior Prom Committee, 
2 ; Mgr. Varsity 
Hockey Team, 3 ; 
Hockey and Basket- 
ball Teams Gym 
Meet ; Music Editor 
Mirror, 3 ; Member 
of the Dramatic Club, 
2, 3 ; Chairman of 
Investigating Commit- 
tee Dramatic Club, 3 ; 
Usher Football Game, 
3 ; Monitor, 2, 3 



EVA KRAMER 

Operetta, 1, 2; Monitor, 2, 
3 ; Usher Football 
Games, 2, 3. 
HELENA LANCASTER 
Red Cross Committee, 2; 
Dramatic Club, 3 ; Or- 
chestra, 3 ; Football 
Usher. 



MARIE MARCHETTI 

Commercial Club, 3. 



REBECCA MARCOU 

Commercial Club, 3. 



DOROTHY MARTIN 
Football Usher, 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 ; 
Candy Girl Senior 
Play, 3; Mirror Staff, 
3 ; Committee Com- 
mercial Club, 3. 



ANNA MARTOWSKI 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 ; Hock- 
ey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball. 
1. 



GERTRUDE 

MCNAMARA 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 2, 3; Sen- 
ior Play, 3. 



ISABEL MEADER 
Basketball Team, 3 
Bowling Team, 3 
Junior Red Cross, 3 
Room Reporter, 2. 



RUTH MELANSON 
Commercial Club, 3. 



LAURA MITCHELL 

Basketball ; Dramatic 

Club; Mirror Staff. 



KATHERINE NOLAN 

Dancing in Operettas. 



OLIVE MOTT 

Monitor, 2, 3; Vice-Pres. 
of Commercial Club ; 
Class Historian. 

PEARL ASTRID 

NELSON 
Bowling, Tennis. 

EVA NICHOLS 

Commercial Club, 3 ; 

FRANCES W. 
NICHOLS 

Basketball, 1 ; Football 
Usher, 2; Social Com- 
mittee, 3 ; Candy 
Committee, Senior 

Play, 3. 

MARTHA OSTRAND 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Sen- 
ior Social Committee, 
3; Operetta, 1, 2; 
Picture Committer, 3 ; 
Senior Play Candy 
Committee, 3 ; Foot- 
ball Usher, 3; Enter- 
tainment Committee 
Commercial Club, 3. 

MARION PARKINSON 

Commercial Club, 3. 

EDITH PIERCE 

Social Committee, 1, 2; 
Chairman Social Com- 
mittee, 3 ; Senior Play 
Committee, 3 ; Junior 
Prom Committee, 2 ; 
Football Usher, 3 ; 
Chairman, Commer- 
cial Club Entertain- 
ment Committee, 3. 



EVELYN F. POWERS 

Served on Class Day Com- 
mittee ; Monitor. 



54 



THE MIRROR 



DOROTHY 

REYNOLDS 

Candy Girl, Senior Play. 

DENA RICCIATO 

Commercial Club, 3 ; So- 
cial Committee, 3. 

VIRGINIA RUSSO 

Basketball, 2 ; Tennis, 3. 

FRANCES REGAN 

Candy Girl, Senior Play. 

EILEEN SANGELEER 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Ten- 
nis, 2. 



MABEL SHEDD 

Monitor; Captain Bowl- 
ing Team ; Tennis. 



HAZEL M. SINCLAIR 
Candy Girl, Senior Play ; 
Member, Dramatic 

Club ; Literary Editor, 
Mirror. 



MARION SLAYTON 
Field Hockey Team, 1 ; 
Basketball, 3 ; Bowl- 
ing, 3 ; Football 
Usher, Red Cross 
Committee, Senior So- 
cial Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Or- 
chestra, 1, 2; Dramat- 
ic Club, 3. 



ELINOR SPENCER 
Chorus, Naughty Mariet- 
ta, 1 ; Alumni Com- 
mittee, Commercial 
Club, 3. 



SARAH THURSTON 
Red Cross Committee, 1 ; 
Mirror Reporter, 1 ; 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; 
Monitor, 2; Milk 
Money, 1, 2; Christ- 
mas Play, 2. 



SUSAN TORTOLA 
Sec, Commercial Club, 

3; Football Usher, 3; 

Senior Play, Candy 

Girl, 3 ; Sec. for 

Mirror. 



LOIS A. TUBBS 

Sec. Waltham High Dra- 
matic Club ; Com- 
mittee Dramatic Club ; 
Hallowe'en Party ; 

Soph. Social Commit- 



F. ADLER 

Senior Play, Class Proph- 
et. 



ALBERT E. 
ANDERSON 

Senior Social Committee ; 
Chairman Sr. Dance 
Committee ; Sr. Play 
Committee ; Head 

Usher ; Basketball, In- 
tra-mural,3 ; Base- 

ball squad, 2; Track 
Team, 3 ; Mgr. of 
Lunch Tickets ; Mem- 
ber of Commercial 
Club, Room Baseball 
Team, 3. 

CARL ANDERSON 

Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN BARTLEMAN 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 
3 ; Class Basketball, 3. 



RALPH ANDREWS 

Football, 1 ; Baseball, 
Basketball, 3 ; Senior 
Play. 



HOWARD BADGER 

Mirror Staff, Literary Ed- 
itor, Usher. 



NORMAN BONNEY 

President, Vocational 

School, Student Coun- 
cil, 3; Basketball, 3. 



MORTON BROWN 
Basketball, 3. 



NICHOLAS 

CANNISTRARO 

Class Basketball, Senior 
Play, Senior Dance 
Committee, Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2. 



SAMUEL D. CAPLAN 
Sophomore Social Com- 
mittee, Junior Social 
Committee, Band, 1, 
2; Operetta, 1, 2; 
Mirror Staff, 1, 2; 
Red Cross Representa- 
tive, 1 ; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3 ; Playground Ball, 
1, 2, 3 ; Dramatic Club 
1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
Play, 1, 2; Football, 
3; Senior Play, 3; 
Official at Band Con- 
clave, 3. 



MICHAEL 

CARAMANICA 

All Star Basketball 
Team, 3. 



PAUL CARLSON 

Baseball, 2, 3 ; Hockey, 3 ; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Football, 2. 



CHARLES KENNETH 
CARNEY 

Monitor, Hand Book 
Committee, Class Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Ath- 
letic Editor, (Mirror), 
Class Day Committee, 
Red Cross, Class 
Baseball, 2, 3. 



DUNCAN G. 
CHAPMAN 

Football, 1, 3; Usher, 2. 



PHILIP CLARK 

School Orchestra and 
Band. 



JAMES W. CROWE 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Base- 
ball, 3; Basketball, 2, 
3 ; Quoits, 1 ; Play- 
ground Ball, 2, 3 ; 
Commercial Club, 3. 



ANSEL B. COOMBS 
Secretary, Student Coun- 
cil, Vocational School, 
Class Basketball. 



EARL DEWAR 
Football, 1, 2, 3. 

MELVIN W. DWYER 

Vocational, All Star 
Basketball Team, 3. 

LEONARD DUBIN 

Band, Usher (Sr. Play) 

CHARLES ELLIOT 

Hockey, 2, 3 ; Class Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Class 

GEORGE EVANS 

Vice President, 2 ; Voca- 
tional School Basket- 
ball Team Champion, 
3; Band, 1, 2, 3. 
Baseball, 1, 2. 

ALFRED H. FREEMAN 
Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3 : 
Class Baseball, 1, 2, 
3 ; Picture Committee 

.1AMES FYNN 
Student Council, 3 ; Bas- 
ketball, 3. 

WILLIAM GERRIE 

Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 
2, 3 ; Chairman of the 
Junior Prom, 2 ; Hock- 
ey, 2. 



LORIMER 

HANSELPACKER 

Football, 2, 3. 



ROGER HENRY 

Basketball, 2, 3; Member 
Student Council. 



DONALD HILLS 
Commercial Club, 3. 

WILBUR W. 
HORNBECK 

Commercial Club Member, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Baseball Team, 
2. 

HERMAN INGBER 
Indoor Baseball, 1 ; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2. 

EMERET IODICE 

Class Baseball, 1 ; Class 
Volley Ball, 1; Class 
Basketball, 2, 3. 



THE MIRROR 

RENATO IODICE 

Basketball, Baseball 



PHILIP JACKSON 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 

1, 2, 3; Operetta, 1, 2; 

Baseball Mgr., 2. 



WALTER JAYNES 

Hockey, 2, 3 ; Tennis, 3 ; 
Senior Play, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 3 ; Foot- 
ball Usher, 2. 



ROBERT JOHNSON 
Senior Play, Football 
Usher. 



STANLEY KROL 
Football, 3; Baseball, 3. 

WALTER LANE 

Football, 3; Baseball, 2, 
3 ; Room Basketball 
Team, 2, 3 ; Track, 3 ; 
Senior Social Commit- 
tee, Chairman, 2nd 
Senior Social, Com- 
mercial Club ; Room 
Basketball Team, 2, 
3 ; Commercial Club 
Social. 



ALFRED LANGILL 

Football, 3 ; Baseball, 
Hockey, Class Basket- 
ball, Class Baseball. 



GEORGE LAPORTE 

Football, 1 ; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3; Track, 3; 
Chairman Senior Pic- 
ture Committee, Senior 
Social Committee. 

ARTHUR LOGAN 
Football, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3; Track, 3; Hock- 
ey, 2. 3 ; Captain 
Hockey, 3 ; Chairman 
Class Day Committee. 

JAMES MACMILLAN 
Cheer Leader, 3 ; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Track 
Team, 3 ; Class Base- 
ball, 1, 2, 3. 



JOHNNIE MAY 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2; 
Sophomore Social 

Committee, Junior So- 
cial Committee. 



55 

J. WILLIAM 

MCDERMOTT 

Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Baseball, 1, 2; 
Student Mgr. of Base- 
ball, 3. 



MILLARD A. 
MERRYMAN 

Class Basketball 2, 3 
Usher, Graduation, 2 
Usher Senior Play, 3 
Class Baseball, 2, 3 



ALESSANDRO MLELE 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2, 3. 



SAMUEL MILESKY 

Orchestra, 1, 2; Drum 
Major Senior High 
School Band, 2, 3 ; Se- 
nior Play Committee, 
Dramatic Club, Liter- 
ary Club. 



HOWARD E. MILLEN 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 ; Band, 

1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3 ; Class Baseball, 
1, 2. 



RICHARD MITCHELL 
Football, 3; Class Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; So- 
cial Committee, 2, 3 : 
Mirror Representative, 
1. 



JOHN E. MULLEN 
Chief in the High School 
Cafeteria, Entertain- 
ment Committee, Com- 
mercial Club. 



THOMAS MURPHY 

Reporter, Commercial 

Club, 3 ; Junior Prom 
Committee, 2 ; Class 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Social Commit 
tee, 2, 3; High School 
Reporter, Golf Team, 
1, 2, 3. 



WILLIAM 

PENDERGAST 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
1, 2, 3; Captain, 3; 
Track, 3. 



56 



THE MIRROR 



GEORGE D. PERNA 
Football, 1, 2; Operetta, 
1, 2; Social Commit- 
tee, 1, 2; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Vice- 
President Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2; Dramatic 
Club Social Committee, 
Junior Prom Commit- 
tee, Sec.-Treas., 1 ; 
Band, 2 ; Senior Dance 
Committee, Senior 

Play Committee, Sen- 
ior Play Cast. 

JOHN GILBERT 
PETERSON 

Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Mgr. 
Lunch Counter, 2, 3 
Senior Play, 3; Asso 
ciate Member Com 
mercial Club, 2 ; Com 
mercial Club, 3 
Hockey, 3 ; Monitor 
2; Class Baseball, 2 
3; Tennis, 3; Asst 
Bus. Mgr. of Mirror 
2; Bus. Mgr. of Mir 
ror, 3; Ticket Seller, 
3. 

RICHARD PONTZ 

Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Baseball, 2 3. 



JOHN QUIGLEY 
Track, 2, 3. 

EDWIN RANDLE 
Orchestra, 1, 2. 

STETSON M. RISDON 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Dra- 
matic Club Treas., 3; 

PAUL RYAN 
Basketball, 3. 



CHESTER RUSSELL 

Basketball, Track Team 
(high jump) Class 
Baseball. 



KENNETH SCANLON 

Class Auditor, 3 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 2 ; Mgr. 
Lunch Counter, 2, 3 ; 
Member Class Base- 
ball Team, 2 ; Sec- 
Treas., 3 ; Pres. Com- 
mercial Club, 3 ; 
Chairman Senior Play, 
3 ; Committee Member 
Senior Dance,, 3 ; 
Member Class Basket- 
ball Team, 3 ; Mem- 
ber Class Baseball 
Team, 3 ; Ticket Sel- 
ler Lunch Counter, 3. 



CHESTER M. SHEER 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 

1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3 ; Commercial 
Club. 



DONALD H. SMITH 
Member of W. H. S. A. 
A ; Capt. Football 
Team, 3 ; Pres. Class 
of 1930. 



PAUL J. SOUSA 
High School Band, 2, 3 ; 
Mgr. Hockey, 2, 3. 



ELLSWORTH 
SPAULDING 

Head Usher, 1929 Gradu- 
ation, Football, Cham- 
pionship Basketball 
Team. 



MALVERN TASKER 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Treas., Commercial 
Club, 3 ; Selling 
Lunch Tickets, Serv- 
ing Soup, 3. 

EDWARD B. 
TATELMAN 

Basketball, Dramatic 

Club, Senior Play 
Committee, 

CLEVELAND THOMAS 

Cast of Naughty Mariet- 
ta, Cast of Ivan the 
Terrible, Cast of 
Seven Keys to Bald- 
pate, Pres. Dramatic 
Club, Cheer Leader, 
Class Day Committee, 
Junior Prom Commit- 
tee, Sophomore Social 
Committee, Junior So- 
cial Committee, Asst. 
Editor of Mirror, Ed- 
itor of Mirror, Room 
Basketball. 

CARL UHLIN 

Commercial Club, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 2; 
Quoits, 1. 



RICHARD WEAR 

Head Usher Football, Se- 
nior Play, Senior 
Dance Committee, 

Writer of Class Will, 
Literary Editor, 1, 3; 



WARREN YOUNG 
Class Baseball Team, 1, 
2 ; Class Basketball, 1, 
2 ; Champion, 3 ; 
Quoits, (Champs) Vol- 
ley Ball, Football 
Manager, 1, 2. 
Literary Editor, 1, 3. 



SALVATORE RIZZO 
Room Basketball Team, 1, 
2, 3; Room Baseball 
Team, 1, 2, 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3. 



WILLIAM STANKARD 

Football, 1, 3; Baseball, 
3. 



AUDREY WILEY 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Pin 
Committee, Commer- 
cial Club, 3. 



THE MIRROR 



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Please Mention The Mirror When Patronizing Advertisers 



QUALITY SERVICE RIGHT PRICES 

CHESTER H. CLARK 

HARDWARE 

Paints, Oils, Windows and Doors 
Auto Delivery Anywhere 

Tel. Wal. 0269 679 Main Street, Waltham 

Central Square Shoe Repairing 

695 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. 



We clean all kinds of Hats 

Soft, Straw and Panama Hats Cleaned 

Bleached and Blocked 

New Bands put on if desired. 

INSURE IN SURE INSURANCE 
WOODWARD & TYLER 

839 MAIN ST. 
WALTHAM 



THE EATON-SNELL DRUG CO. 

T. H. SNELL, Reg. Mgr. 

677 Main St., Central Sq. Waltham, Mass 



Please Mention The Mirror W hen Patronizing Advertisers 

GEORGE E. OLSON 

<JMEN'S SHOP 

337 MOODY STREET WALTHAM 



H. W. BLOCKSOM 

Peninsular Paint and Varnish 

Wall Papers 
Painting, Interior Decorating 

Texturing a Specialty 

837 Main Street Waltham, Mass 

Tel. Wal. 2142 
We Deliver Anywhere 

SWEATER AND JERSEY 

Made to match your school colors at reasonable prices. 

We also repair old sweaters. 

WALTHAM KNITTING MILLS 

400 Newton Street 
Tel. Wal. 4093-W 



Please Mention The Mirror When Patronizing Advertisers 



WALTHAM NATIONAL BANK 



RUFUS WARREN & SONS 
Fine Footwear 

Telephone' Connection 

Repairing Promptly and Neatly Done 

39 Moody St. Waltham, Mass. 



RICHARD H. BIRD 

Manufacturer of 

Electrical Instruments, Watch 

and Clock Jewels 



Please Mention The Mirror When Patronizing Advertisers 



Geo. O. Carter & Co, 

342 Moody Street 

Reliable Prescription 
Pharmacists 

CARTER BAEVE CO. 

Main and Rich Streets 



CROVER CRONIN 

A Store of Specialty Shops 




Main Office and Factory 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



BRANCH OFFICES 
NEW YORK, PHILA., NEWARK, & SPRINGFIELD 



AUTOGRAPHS 




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Please Mention The Mirror When Patronizing Advertisers 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 




DAY DIVISION 



THE 

SCHOOL OF 

ENGINEERING 

In co-operation with engin- 
eering firms, offers five year 
curriculums leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree in 
the following branches of en- 
gineering: 

Civil Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 



THE 

SCHOOL OP BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

Co-operating with business 
firms, offers five year collegiate 
courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in the fol- 
lowing fields of business: 

Accounting 

Business Management 

Banking and Finance 



The Co-operative Plan of training enables the student to com- 
bine theory with practice and makes it possible for him to earn 
his tuition and a part of his other school expenses. 

For catalog or any further information write to : 

Northeastern University 

MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 



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